BELIZE CERC ESMF revised Aug 10 2020

 

BELIZE

Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (BCRIP)

(P127338)

  

CONTINGENT EMERGENCY RESPONSE COMPONENT (CERC)

 

ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK (ESMF)

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Submitted: August 10, 2020

Prepared by: CRIP Project Management Unit

 

Table of contents

 

1       Executive Summary. 6

2       Introduction and Background  8

2.1       The CERC allocation. 10

2.2       Coordination & Implementation Arrangements. 12

3       Objective and Application of the ESMF. 13

4       Scope of the ESMF. 13

5       Project Description. 14

6       Belize National Laws and Regulations. 16

6.1       National Regulation. 16

6.2       The World Bank Safeguard Policies. 19

7       Applicable World Bank Safeguard Policies. 22

8       Pertinent Environmental and Social Baseline. 27

9       Procedures to Address Environmental and Social Issues. 28

10     Procedures to Address Environmental and Social issues for the CERC Positive List 35

10.1         Step 1. Application of E&S Screening Processes. 35

10.2         Step 2: E&S Assessment, Preparation, Consultation and Disclosure of Safeguards Instruments. 36

10.3         Step 3: Review and Application of Safeguards Instruments. 36

11     Environmental and Social Management Measures applicable to the CERC EAP. 36

12     Monitoring, Supervision and Reporting. 38

13     Implementation Arrangements and Responsibilities. 38

14     Capacity Building. 42

15     Stakeholder Engagement and Disclosure. 45

Annex 1.  Positive list of goods, services and works. 46

Annex 2. Negative List for CERC Expenditures. 47

Annex 3. Screening Form for Potential Environmental and Social Issues. 48

Annex 4. Environmental and Social Management Plan Template. 52

Annex 5. Guidelines for Usages of PPE for Prevention. 55

Annex 6. Helpful Resources for Covid-19 Pandemic Planning and Management 56

Bibliography. 57

 

 

List of Tables

Table 1. World Bank Applicable Safeguard Policies. 22

Table 2.  Main National Legal Instruments relevance to the project and WB Triggered Policies. 26

Table 3. Procurement list of CERC activities. 28

Table 4. Expenditure program for Poultry Farmers. 29

Table 5. Expenditure program for Beef Cattle Farmers. 29

Table 6. Expenditure program for Pig Farmers. 30

Table 7. Expenditure program for Sheep Farmers. 30

Table 8. Expenditure program for Shrimp Farmers. 31

Table 9. Expenditure program for Dairy Farmers. 31

Table 10. Expenditure program for Grain and Pulses Farmers. 31

Table 11. Expenditure program for Vegetable Farmers. 32

Table 12. Expenditure program for all Farmers and Beneficiaries. 32

Table 13. Expenditure program for Compensation to vegetable farmers simultaneously affected by drought and COVID-19 pandemic. 33

Table 14. Expenditure program for Compensation to Sugar Cane Farmers affected by Drought 33

Table 15. Technical Assistance and Items to be Procured under Administration. 34

Table 16. Operational Costs. 34

Table 16. detailed breakdown of the budget activities. 37

Table 17. Implementation Steps, with Assigned Responsibilities, Associated with EAP. 40

 

 

 

List of abbreviation

 

BAIMS Belize Agriculture Information Management System
BCRIP Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (P127338)
CAO Chief Agriculture Officer
CERC Contingency Emergency Response Component
CESAP Climate Resilient Agriculture Project
CRIP Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project
COVID 19 Corona SARS virus
DoE Department of Environment
DAC District Agriculture Coordinator
EA Environmental Assessment
EAP Emergency Action Plan
ECP Environmental Compliance Plan
EHS Environmental Health and Safety
EIA Environmental Impact Assessment
EMF Environmental Management Framework
EMP Environmental Management Plan
ESF Environmental and Social Framework
ESMF Environmental and Social Management Framework
ESMP Environmental and Social Management Plan
ESIA Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
ESS Environmental and Social Standard
E&S Environmental and Social
FI Financial Intermediary
FM Financial Management team
GoB Government of Belize
GIIP Good International Industries Practice
GRM Grievance Redress Mechanism
HBB Heritage Bank of Belize Limited
IFC International Finance Corporation
MoA Ministry of Agriculture
MoFAI Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration
MoFFSD Ministry of Forests, Fisheries and Sustainable Development
MoF Ministry of Finance
MoWT Ministry of Work and Transport
MHDSTPA Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation
MNRA Ministry of Natural Resources and Agriculture
OAS Organization of American States
0HS Occupational Health and Safety
OM Operations Manual
PMU Project Management Unit
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
PSC Project Steering Committee
RAP Resettlement Action Plan
RCCE Risk Communication and Community Engagement
SECP Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Plan
SI Statutory Instrument
SIF Social Investment Fund
WB World Bank
WHO World Health Organization

 

 

1           Executive Summary

The Government of Belize (GoB) and the World Bank have prepared the Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (BCRIP) (P127338) financed by a loan of US$30 Million. The objectives of the Project are: (a) to enhance the resilience of road infrastructure against flood risk and impacts of climate change; and (b) to improve the Borrower’s capacity to respond promptly and effectively in an Eligible Crisis or Emergency. The Loan Agreement stipulates the preparation and furnishing of an Operations Manual (OM) for Component 4: Contingent Emergency Response Component (hereafter referred to as “CERC”) to the World Bank for its review and approval. This document serves as the CERC  Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF), based on the scopes of the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) of the Operations Manual (OM) for these proposed emergency activities to be financed by the proceeds of the CERC, and also includes the coordination and implementation arrangements related to the programming and execution of said activities.  The specific activities to be financed by the funds reallocated to CERC are event and demand-driven. The activities selected shall be consistent with CERC’s purpose to provide short-term bridge financing exclusively for the immediate recovery needs related to an eligible emergency. The contents of this CERC-ESMF represent the framework by which CERC activities shall address the Environmental and Social Safeguards issues, that could be activated during its implementation as to comply with the World Bank and National policies and procedures as agreed with the World Bank.

 

Around US$13 million has been allocated to the MHDSTPA for a Social Protection Programme and specifically to fund a Vertical BOOST (Belize Conditional Cash Transfer) Programme and a Horizontal BOOST (Belize COVID-19 Cash Transfer (BCCAT)) Programme. Under the Vertical BOOST Programme funds will be supplied to fund the original BOOST Programme (3016 households) for a year, including a temporary vertical increase in payments for six months to smooth consumption. Under the Horizontal BOOST Programme, (BCCAT) funds will be used to assist an additional 10,500 households for six months. The details for the selection of beneficiaries, payments, and payment systems for the BCCAT Programme are being finalized.

 

The Ministry of Food and Agriculture and Immigration (MoFAI) has identified 5 major components with an allocation of US$ 8 million under the CERC; Component 1 provides relief to farmers who were severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, whereas component 4 provides relief to farmers who were severely impacted by the prolonged 2019 drought. Farmers assisted in component 1 cannot be assisted in component 4 and vice versa. Component 2, Post-harvest management, provides support to farmers and small farmer groups involved in vegetable production whereas component 3 supports all women registered in the BAIMS and all men farming <20 acres of land and are registered in the BAIMS. Component 5 will provide support to the technical and administrative team.  The components are as listed below: Component 1 – USD 3.67 M – Market contraction caused by steep fall in demand; Component 2 – USD 0.48 M -Post Harvest Management; Component 3 – USD 1.34 M – Cash transfer; Component 4 – USD 2.37M -Drought relief; Component 5 – USD 0.12 M -Technical Assistance.

 

The CRIP PMU will be responsible for the overall implementation of the CERC, with the support of the MHDSTPA and MOFAI to implementing the goods and services detailed in positive list of the EAP. Also a Project Steering Committee (PSC) was established,  with members from the Ministry of Economic Development and Petroleum (MEDP) (Chair), Ministry of Finance (MOF), Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation (MHDSTPA), Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration (MOFAI), and Social Investment Fund ( SIF) is responsible for execution and implementation of the CERC. The PSC will ensure the delivery of the EAP outputs, review EAP progress reports, assess all policy-related issues, and provide guidance as needed.

 

An assessment of the sub-projects (BOOST and BCCAT) under the MHDSTPA Proposal did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes related to Cash Transfers, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety.

 

An assessment of the sub-project’s proposed activities under the MOFAI Proposal as listed in tables 4 to 16 did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes, than those expressed and specifically listed in table 2, for the Environmental Safeguards for this Belize CRIP-CERC, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety for workers and communities. For some activities and follow ups on environmental and social issues, there are templates for Activities Screening (annex 3); Risk Assessment (annex 4), and Environmental Management Plan template (annex 5) that can be utilized to determine the relevant actions to be taken if necessary to carry forward with minimal or no action or to mitigate potential impacts.

 

2           Introduction and Background[1]

The Government of Belize (GoB) and the World Bank have prepared the Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (BCRIP) (P127338) financed by a loan of US$30 Million. The objectives of the Project are: (a) to enhance the resilience of road infrastructureagainst flood risk and impactsof climate change; and (b) to improve the Borrower’s capacity to respond promptly and effectively in an Eligible Crisis or Emergency, as required. Road segments and stream crossings that are susceptible to flooding and highly critical to maintaining effective and secure transport networks would be considered for retrofitting and rehabilitation. This is in order to build and enhance climate resilience and also improve disaster risk management in order to enabling sustainable national development. The application of an integrated and comprehensive approach to road infrastructure improvement would maximize the efficient use of resources.

 

The main geographical areas of priority are: a) Greater Belize City area, b) West of Belmopan, c) Northern Area around Corozal, and the d) Southern Area around Independence. The specific sub-projects will be located within one or more of these areas. These main geographical areas encompass primary and secondary roads and will bear no impact to critical natural habitats, protected areas, or reserves. The infrastructure activities (i.e., hydrological improvements that may include small-scale creek alignment straightening of ox-bows, cut and-fill, retaining walls along embankments, sizing of culverts to manage water flow better along the primary and secondary road networks, some replacement of culverts with small bridges; as well as road rehabilitation, road widening and shoulder improvement) are not expected to lead to pollution or degradation of the natural environment (soil, water, and air) nor disturbance to wildlife. In the event of an environmental impacts, however minimal, appropriate mitigation measures will be adopted. The Project may include safety measures (such as speed bumps) in areas that are densely populated, near schools, or in the vicinity of protected sites (e.g., national parks and reserves, and key ecological habitats).

 

The GoB, in particular the Social Investment Fund (SIF) with assistance of the Ministry ofWorks and Transport (MoWT), was responsible for the preparation of the safeguard instruments required for the project preparation, in particular, an Environmental Management Framework (EMF) with its Environmental Management Process and Screening Procedures , this ensures that the Project applies the required World Bank Safeguards for the proposed activities and follows the GoB environmental guidance and builds capacity in-country for producing the required safeguard instruments.

 

On March 12, 2020 the World Health Organization(WHO), declared the Corona Virus COVID-19 as a global pandemic due to the rapid increase in the number of cases. The first confirmed case of COVID-19 detected in Belize was on March 23, 2020 in San Pedro, Ambergris Caye, a person who recently returned from a visit abroad. The Corona COVID -19 virus is not restricted to a specific area and is a threat for the whole country. Special attention was paid to all the entry points (maritime entry and riverine ports, international highway entry gates) through the Country’s borders as well as the international entries and frontiers.

 

The Government of Belize, in response to the COVID-19 crisis, enacted Statutory Instrument (SI) Number 38 of 2020 on March 25, 2020 in an effort to mitigate the negative impacts that could result from a potential community spread of the deadly virus. This Order made by the Quarantine Authority of Belize, in exercise of the powers conferred upon it by section 6 of the Quarantine Act, Chapter 41 of the Substantive Laws of Belize, Revised Edition 2011, outlines a set of immediate measures to be implemented by the Government that are deemed as necessary to safeguard public health and prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Order shall be valid until revoked by the Quarantine Authority. According to the Belize’s Director of Health Services, as of 14th July 2020, Belize have registered thirty-nine confirmed cases of COVID-19, including two deaths, twenty recovered patients and 16 active cases. Starting from 1st April 2020 the Government of Belize (GoB) declared a state of emergency (SoE) and announced restrictions on all non-essential activities in addition to shuttering businesses and schools, restricting domestic transportation, and placing the country into a quarantine. The Government also took measures by putting in action an Interim National COVID-19 Response Plan including restricting entry of foreigners and enhancing screening at ports of entry. The measures enacted by the GoB has been successful in containing the spread of the virus, while simultaneously crippling the country’s economic activities.

 

The CERC Operations Manual (OM), and the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) for the BCRIP projects includes activities for agriculture assistance, which includes additional information to reflect a more generic nature for aid assistance to farmers. This has been the approach of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture and Immigration (MoFAI)which has identified 5 major components under the CERC and allocated a percentage of the funds to the various components. Component 1 provides relief to farmers who were severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, whereas component 4 provides relief to farmers who were severely impacted by the prolonged 2019 drought. Farmers assisted in component 1 cannot be assisted in component 4 and vice versa. Component 2, Post-harvest management, provides support to farmers and small farmer groups involved in vegetable production whereas component 3 supports all women registered in the BAIMS and all men farming <20 acres of land and are registered in the BAIMS. Component 5 will provide support to the technical and administrative team.  The components are as listed below: Component 1 – USD 3.6 M – Market contraction caused by steep fall in demand; Component 2 – USD 0.48 M -Post Harvest Management; Component 3 – USD 1.3 M – Cash transfer; Component 4 – USD 2.3M -Drought relief; Component 5 – USD 0.11M -Technical Assistance

 

This Environmental and Social Management Framework (EMSF) is developed to support the environment and social due diligence provisions for activities to be financed which consists of a series of services and goods as detailed in the positive list of the EAP prepared for the CERC activation of the BCRIP project to address this COVID-19 emergency response.

 

2.1         The CERC allocation

The Government of Belize, in anticipating this outcome, decided on an unemployment relief programme, enhanced food assistance and social protection programme to avoid people falling back into poverty and to ensure a resilient and energetic workforce to aid the recovery process as economic activities are resumed.  Hence, the GoB approached the World Bank and other funding Agencies to assist in the overall process of emergency preparedness and recovery providing unemployment assistance, food assistance and social protection to those in need.

 

In this regard, the GOB wrote to the Bank on March 23rd, 2020 requesting consideration in connection with the reallocation of funds within the CRIP Project through re-categorization of uncommitted financial resources from Disbursement Category 1 to Disbursement Category 4 to implement activities which will be detailed in the Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan and the corresponding revised Procurement Plan. The CERC Operations Manual (OM)   and the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) are being improved and updated to include new and additional information to reflect a more generic nature where the OM is concerned to inform the development of more specific EAP and the relevant supporting detailed documentation required to support the request for triggering the CERC.

 

Currently, the activities under components 1 and 2 of the project are suspended indefinitely and the undisbursed funds from those two components have been earmarked for transfer to the CERC component totalling the US $21 million (inclusive of US$1 million originally allocated to the CERC component 4) for use by the GOB to support COVID-19 related activities within the Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation  (MHDSTPA) and the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration (MOFAI).

 

Around US$13 million has been allocated to the MHDSTPA for a Social Protection Programme and specifically to fund a Vertical BOOST (Belize Conditional Cash Transfer) Programme and a Horizontal BOOST (Belize COVID-19 Cash Transfer (BCCAT)) Programme. Under the Vertical BOOST Programme funds will be supplied to fund the original BOOST Programme (3016 households) for a year, including a temporary vertical increase in payments for six months to smooth consumption. Under the Horizontal BOOST Programme, (BCCAT) funds will be used to assist an additional 10,500 households for six months. The details for the selection of beneficiaries, payments, and payment systems for the BCCAT Programme are being finalized. (Proposal attached in the CERC EAP))

 

For the purpose to assists the agriculture sector, the MoFAI has identified 5 major components under the CERC valuing USD 8 million in total and allocated a percentage of the funds to the various components.  Component 1 provides relief to farmers who were severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, whereas component 4 provides relief to farmers who were severely impacted by the prolonged 2019 drought. Farmers assisted in component 1 cannot be assisted in component 4 and vice versa. Component 2, Post-harvest management, provides support to farmers and small farmer groups involved in vegetable production whereas component 3 supports all women registered in the BAIMS and all men farming <20 acres of land and are registered in the BAIMS. Component 5 will provide support to the technical and administrative team.  The components are as listed below:

 

  • Component 1 – USD 3.6 M: Market contraction caused by steep fall in demand

Under component 1, the funds were allocated to the subsectors based on:

  • severity of the economic impact caused by COVID-19 on the particular sub-sector;
  • number of farmers impacted;
  • estimated loss per sector;
  • ability for the sub sector to quickly recover after the pandemic.

These sub sectors include, Poultry, Dairy, Vegetables, Cattle, Pigs, Sheep, Shrimp, Pulses and Grains.

 

  • Component 2 – USD 0.48 M: Post Harvest Management

Vegetable farmers will be assisted under this component.  Apart from diminished sales experienced, losses continue to increase due to limited post-harvest management handling.  In addition, product quality becomes compromised during storage and transportation from point of origin to point of sale.

 

  • Component 3 – USD 1.3 M: Cash transfer

The effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic including the total collapse of the tourism industry, loss of domestic purchasing power due to job losses and the overall national lockdown has led to a severe domestic market contraction, export market collapse and transport logistic challenges. Component 3 will support all women (2052) registered in the Belize Agriculture Information Management System (BAIMS) and all males farming <20 acres ofland who are registered in the BAIMS.

 

  • Component 4 – USD 2.3M: Drought relief

The agriculture sector in Belize suffered from a severe drought in 2019. [2] The MoFAI 2019 drought report estimated that the agriculture sector suffered a total loss of USD 38.48M/ Bzd 76.96M for both the crops and livestock subsectors. Component 4 will support farmers in the vegetable and sugarcane subsectors who were severely impacted by the 2019 drought. The vegetable sub sector suffered a loss of USD 5.1M with reduced production volumes, whereas the sugar cane subsector suffered losses of USD 9.65M. The total relief offered to the vegetable and sugarcane subsector under this component is USD 1.3M and USD 1M respectively. The sugarcane sub sector was recently assisted by the GoB through a USD 1M loan from the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB); therefore, this USD 1M assistance is thus complementing the CDB loan offered to the sugarcane sub sector.

 

  • Component 5 – USD 0.12M: Technical Assistance

Component 5 includes hiring of technical support, procurement of materials and equipment, and operating costs to ensure rapid and successful implementation of the CERC.

 

All project activities to be financed under this CERC activation corresponds solely to the list of goods and services detailed in the EAP prepared for this project.

 

2.2         Coordination & Implementation Arrangements

As per the CERC OM Coordination & Implementation Arrangements (Section E, Page 09) will be: The Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (CRIP) Management Unit (PMU) of the Social Investment Fund (SIF) is the coordinating lead entity of CERC within the GOB. PMU is responsible for the preparation of the EAP and monitoring its day-to-day implementation with the support provided by other partners. PMU is also responsible for the overall implementation of CERC and shall be the focal point for all aspects related to procurement, financial management, disbursement, monitoring & evaluation, and safeguard compliance, with assistance as necessary, from the wider SIF staff. Other GOB Ministries that possess the technical expertise to implement specific activities as agreed in the EAP will be required to support the PMU with the implementation and monitoring of all activities funded by CERC. The existing contracts of PMU staff expires on August 31, 2020. Five of the PMU staff already working within the SIF on the CRIP will be working on the implementation of the CERC and as such, will be issued new contracts through direct contracting as they already possess profound knowledge on the CRIP and relevant WB processes. The contract end dates will coincide with the CRIP loan closing date of August 30, 2021. The PMU staff comprise of the Project Coordinator, Social/ M & E Officer, Senior Accounts Officer, Procurement Officer and Administrative Assistant. These contracts and other SIF support will continue to be paid from Component 3: Project Management of the CRIP.

 

Technical Input:The Line Ministries will provide technical inputs to the PMU in terms of monitoring the EAP implementation activities. PMU will be responsible for coordinating with the Line Ministries in accordance with the procedures described below:

 

  • Each Line Ministry will provide the technical specifications, the scope of work, estimated budget, schedule and other requirements associated with activities included in the EAP, and will participate in the subsequent evaluation activities;
  • PMU will review specifications, the scope of work, budget, schedule, terms, and conditions of employment, and prepare procurement documents according to the procurement plan specified in the EAP;
  • PMU can include, in the EAP, technical assistance in the form of consulting services for (i) developing the technical specifications, the scope of work, estimated budget, schedule, and other requirements, if the “in-house” capacity of the Line Ministries needs to be supplemented; and (ii) supervision of works and other activities included in the EAP. The technical consultants will work closely with the Line Ministries but report to PMU, as implementation coordinating agency of the CERC;
  • The Line Ministries shall provide reports related to safeguards compliance and all the other information required to monitor and evaluate the EAP implementation; and
  • If required, the PMU will bolster its EAP implementation supervision capacity through the engagement of technical consultants who would support the Line Ministries in the finalization of bidding documents and site supervision of activities as needed. The technical consultants will work closely with the Line Ministries but report to the PMU. The technical officials may be located within the SIF Main Office to support the PMU if necessary.

 

The SIF PMU will be responsible for the overall implementation of the CERC with the support of the MoFAI to implementing the EAP. The MoFAI technical officer in collaboration with the DACs will ensure coordination of activities with beneficiary farmers and suppliers based on the implementation timelines provided in the EAP. Information regarding the project activities coordinated by the MoFAI will be provided to SIF in a timely manner.

3           Objective and Application of the ESMF

This CERC ESMF follows applicable World Bank Environmental and Social Safeguard Policies and relevant GoB environmental laws and regulations.  The main objectives of the ESMF are to (a) ensure full compliance with the WB’s Safeguards Policies and (b) mitigate potential negative environment and social (E&S) risks and impacts during the implementation of the CERC activities. The ESMF provides principles and specific processes and technical guidance for BCRIP-PMU of the SIF, and their consultants to manage the E&S risks and impacts of the CERC activities. The ESMF is developed to apply to all activities included in the positivelist(annex 1) of eligible expenditures that could be financed under the CERC activations, as well as to the specific expenditures included under the EAP to be financed by this CERC activation as targeted  assistance for the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration (MOFAI).

4           Scope of the ESMF

The specific objectives of the ESMF are to: (a) establish clear procedures for the E&S screening, review, approval, and implementation of CERC activities based on the positive list of eligible expenditures; (b) assess the potential E&S risks and impacts of the proposed EAP activities, and if needed, propose mitigation measures which will effectively address these risks/impacts; (c) specify appropriate roles and responsibilities, and outline the necessary reporting procedures, for managing and monitoring E&S issues/concerns related to CERC activities; (d) identify the training and capacity building needed to successfully implement the provisions of the ESMF; (e) address mechanisms for public consultation and disclosure of project documents as well as redress of possible grievances; and (f) establish the budget requirement for implementation of  the ESMF. The ESMF also requires social assessments to develop specific management measures depending on the nature, extent and coverage of CERC related activities now and in the future. The World Bank advocates specific measures to address vulnerable ethnic groups and/or affected peoples in such circumstances.

 

The following sections provides information on the Project description, then after follows the relevant policies and legal and institutional background and E&S baseline pertinent to the Project.  Also, there is a section that describes the procedures to assess and address potential E&S risks and impacts of CERC activities as well as the proposed mitigation and management measures specific to the EAP. Besides there are provisions for the requirements for Monitoring, Supervision and Reporting. Last sections describe the implementation arrangements and capacity building needs under the CERC. Finally, the Annexes include relevant E&S forms, templates, guidelines, as well as a collection of useful resources for COVID-19 planning and management based on Good International Industries Practice(GIIP).

 

The scope of the present document is to provide an effective and efficient E&S risk management specifically to the Direct Assistance to Beneficiaries activities to be financed undertheCERC activities. This ESMF will be revised at a later stage to address the other activities to be financed under the CERC.

 

5           Project Description

Project Components.

The BCRIP is financingclimate resilience activities under thefollowing four mutuallyreinforcing components:

 

Component 1: Climate Resilient Infrastructure (US$21.500 million). This component will reduce physical vulnerability of critical infrastructure through the retrofitting andrehabilitation of existing infrastructure within the primary and secondary road network including associated drainage and flood mitigation systems in order to strengthen their resilience to naturalhazards and the anticipated impacts of climate variability. This component will also financestudies required to support engineering design options and final detailed designs solutions.

 

Component 2: Technical Assistance for Improved Climate Resilience Management(US$4.925 million). This component aims to strengthen the capacity of relevant technical lineministries, MoWT and Ministry of Natural Resources and Agriculture (MNRA), to mainstreamclimate resilience considerations into core physical and investment planning and assetmaintenance.The component will aim to strengthen the capacity available to the MNRA andMoWTthroughtargeted training, as well as equipment and knowledge acquisition. Specifically,the proposed component will support:

 

Component 2A – Support to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Agriculture (MNRA).Thiscomponent will provide technical support for improved land-use and territorial planning, aswell as the development of an information baseline and complimentary data managementplatform. It will support the Land Information Center to consolidate existing geographicinformation system databases, to establish data sharing protocols and management platform,toprovide training programs tailored to the center and other staff needs for datamanagement. Inaddition, it will support the Physical Planning Unit in mainstreaming climate resilienceconsiderations and disaster risk information into land use and territorial planning.

 

Component 2B – Support to the Ministry of Works and Transport (MoWT). Targetedtechnical assistance and training will be financed under this component to strengthen theministry’s infrastructure maintenance and asset management capacities. In particular,Component 2Bwill support the implementation of the RMS including specific measures toenhance the operations and maintenance capacity of the MoWT, such as the operationalization ofthe RMU. In addition, this component will finance the development of technical standards forcapital investments to take into account climate risk and incorporate appropriate mitigationstrategies, which would be applied to all publicly financed capital investments.

 

Component 3: Project Management and Implementation Support (US$2.000 million). Activities under this component would support strengthening and developing, whereneeded,the institutional capacity for Project management, including: (a) strengthening the PMUandline ministries, through staffing, training, and operating costs; (b) preparation of Projectreports; (c) procurement and financial management; (d) coordination of participating lineMinistries; (e) compliance with social and environmental safeguards; (f) training of staff inProject management and implementation technical support; (g) monitoring and evaluation ofProject progress and results; and (h) related activities to support efficient Projectmanagementand implementation, through the provision of training, operating costs, andacquisition of goods.

 

Component 4: Contingent Emergency Response (US$1.000 million). This componentwill provide support for immediate response to an eligible crisis or emergency, as needed. Acrisisor emergency eligible for financing is: an event that has caused, or is likely to imminentlycause, a major adverse economic and/or social impact to the Borrower, associated with anaturalor man-made crisis or disaster. Rapid disbursement of funds will allow the GoB to request areallocation of project funds to partially cover emergency response and recoverycosts. Thiscomponent will be triggered if: (i) the GoB has determined that an eligible crisis oremergencyhas occurred and has furnished to the Bank a request to include said activities in the CERC foremergency response; (ii) the GoB has prepared and disclosed all safeguardsinstrumentsrequiredfor said activities; (iii) the Borrower has adopted the CERC Operations Manual (OM) in form,substance and manner acceptable to the Bank. A specific OM for thiscomponent will beprepared detailing financial management, procurement, safeguards, andany other necessaryimplementation arrangements. While Components 1, 2 and 3 focus onpre-crisis disaster riskmitigation and climate resilience enhancement measures, Component4 will help to strengthen the GoB’s capacity to respond effectively to an eligible crisis or emergency.

 

The guidanceand procedures included in this CERC ESMF are aligned with the Emergency Response Operations Manual and EAP that were prepared as required to activate the CERC (Component 4) by GoB They incorporate relevant World Bank E&S safeguard policies as applicable to CERC operations.

6           Belize National Laws and Regulations[3]

The Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project implementation will need to comply with the national legal framework of Belize. In Belize, protection of the environment from degradation is primarily the responsibility of the Department of the Environment (DoE) under the portfolio of the Ministry of Forests, Fisheries and Sustainable Development (MFFSD). Notwithstanding this, environmental protection also lies within the purview of other agencies. The Forest Department has responsibility for protection of terrestrial ecosystems generally and provides management oversight through the issuance of licensing, monitoring and enforcement of the pertinent local laws. The Geology and Petroleum Department is legally tasked with oversight for dredging, mining and oil exploration activities.

 

The BCRIP subprojects will abide by the relevant laws, guidelines and licensing processes of each of these Government of Belize agencies and those of others that are required. Table 1 shows the main national legal instruments that are applicable to this project, and relates them to the relevant World Bank Environmental Safeguard Policies.

 

6.1         National Regulation

The Environmental Protection Act

This Act is the most comprehensive piece of environmental legislation in Belize. The law demonstrates, as stated in the preamble, the commitment of the Government of Belize (GoB) to the protection and preservation of Belize’s natural heritage to ensure that exploitation of the resources is consistent with maintaining ecological balance. The Department of the Environment (DoE) is given full control in regards to the prevention of pollution on land, water and air, prohibitions on dumping of waste, environmental impact assessment and the control of nutrients deposited into the environment.

 

The Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations

The EIA process in Belize is comprehensive and follows internationally accepted stages: screening, scoping, EIA, reporting, public consultation, a review process, and the preparation of an environmental compliance plan (ECP). The EIA procedure is controlled by the DoE, which is responsible among other things for determining whether an EIA is required, reviewing, and approving the TOR prepared by the project proponent, determining procedures for public consultation, and directing the evaluation and approval of the EIA report.  A project for which a full EIA is mandatory includes under Schedule I – Infrastructure Projects: – (c) Construction of national highways and roads of more than 10 miles in length.

 

The Wildlife Protection Act

This Act aims for the protection and conservation of all wildlife species in Belize, especially those of conservation concerns. These species reside in but not limited to forests, lakes, rivers, fresh water, savannahs, and trees and maintain an integral part of ecosystems in regard to the balance of food chains and in turn aids to balance an ecosystem and its functions. Thus, it was deemed essential to implement the Wildlife Protection Act and putting into effect regulations for the use and limitation of use of wildlife and all that is contingent on for its survival.

 

The National Integrated Water Recourse Act

This Act aims for the monitoring and sustainable use of freshwater resources. As water is a finite resource, its likelihood to reduce is a key concern for Belize. These regulations aid in the controlled allocation of water resources.

 

The Land Utilization Act

This Act lays out the procedures to manage and regulate the sustainable use and development of land as well as conservation measures for land resources.

Pollution Regulations

These regulations developed the mechanisms to monitor and govern air, noise, water, and land pollution. These regulations prohibit the release of toxins, poisons, and chemicals into the environment.

 

The Forest Act

This Act provides for the protection and preservation of trees, forest products as it relates to felling of trees, grazing of cattle, hunting, shooting, clearing for cultivation, burning lime or charcoal, and collecting and removing forest products. This Act also enforces the protection of Mangrove Regulations, which arrange for the protection of mangroves, with restrictions on mangrove alteration and/or clearance. Forest reserves can also be declared under this Act.

 

The National Parks System Act

Allows for the designation of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, natural monument and nature reserves. The various categories of protected areas allow for varying uses of the different categories. In addition to the existing protected areas, a number of other areas have been proposed for declaration and for all practical purposes are considered within the system of protected areas.

 

The Nuisances Act

The Act provides that where any building or place or any activity of the contractors, whether by land or water, is a nuisance, a summary jurisdiction court may, if it thinks fit, order that the nuisance be abated either immediately after service of the order or within such time as may be reasonable according to the circumstances, and may also if it thinks fit, prohibit the recurrence of the nuisance.

 

The Public Health Act and Regulations

The Public Health Act regulates water supply, drainage, garbage collection and storage, infectious diseases, mosquito destruction, sanitation and prevention of nuisances in all spaces. Also, the Public Health Act makes provisions for ensuring that establishments providing food services are staffed by persons in receipt of Food Handlers Certificates from the Public Health Department and that these food establishments have sanitary toilet and washing facilities.

 

The Social Security Act

This Act requires that employers pay social security contributions for their employees to assist them in times of sickness or injury. Other benefits are provided for the worker under the Act.

 

The Protection against Sexual Harassment Act and Regulations

The provisions of the Protection against Sexual Harassment Act prohibit sexual harassment in the workplace by an employer or fellow employees.

 

The Labour Act and Regulations

Labour relations between contactors and their workers is governed by the Labour Act which makes provisions for recruiting employees, terms and conditions of employment, payment of wages, dispute resolution, among others.

 

The Workmen Compensation Act

The Workmen Compensation Act applies to workers who are involved with cases of accidents on the job or while being transported to the job. The Act makes provisions for the contactors’ liability for compensation, amount of compensation, conditions of compensation, insurance, insolvency, or bankruptcy of the contractor, etc.

 

The Family and Children’s Act and Regulations

The Act prohibits employing any child in a capacity where such employment or engagement in any activity that is detrimental to his/her health, education, or mental, physical or moral development.

 

The Village Council Act and Regulations

This Act establishes village councils for every village and mandates them with the good governance and improvement of the community including the sanitation of the village, drainage and sewage, the suppression and abatement of nuisances, ensuring sound environmental practices by all persons in the village, etc.

 

The Motor Vehicles and Road Traffic Act

This Act prohibits persons from driving work vehicles without licenses or authorizations, from driving while under the influence of drink or drugs, and from driving recklessly or carelessly on all public roads.

 

The National Institute for Culture and History Act

This Act makes provision with respect to the protection and conservation of ancient monuments and related matters. All ancient monuments and antiquities, whether upon any land or in any river, stream or watercourse, or under territorial waters of the country should not be destroyed and no person shall possess or have in custody any ancient monument or antiquity except under a license granted by the relevant Minister.

 

6.2         The World Bank Safeguard Policies

During project preparation (2013), six (6) environmental Safeguard Policies were triggered for theBelize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (BCRIP). These policies are: OP/BP 4.01 EnvironmentalAssessment, OP/BP 4.04 Natural Habitats, OP/BP 4.11 Physical Cultural Resources, and OP/BP 7.60 Projects in Disputed Areas.

 

These policies have been applied to ensure that project funds are engaged in a manner consistentwith Bank Institutional Policies with respect to Environmental Protection and Management.

 

The Bank’s Environmental and Social Safeguards Policies pursue three objectives: a) to assure thatenvironmental aspects are evaluated in the decision-making process; b) to reduce and tomanagethe risks and impacts of a program or project; and c) to provide mechanisms for consultation and information disclosure regarding project activities to interested and affected parties.SIF will adopt the World Bank Environmental and SocialSafeguards Policies in order to assure theenvironmental sustainability of BCRIP subprojects and assume compliance and monitoringresponsibility.

 

Policy OP/BP 4.01 – Environmental Assessment (EA)

This policy is triggered if a project is likely to have potential (adverse) environmental risks andimpacts in its areas of influence. OP 4.01 covers impacts on the natural environment (air,waterand land); human health and safety; physical cultural resources; and trans-boundary and globalenvironment concerns. This project has been classified as Category B and environmentalassessments are required during preparation of the sub-projects. According to the Policy, aProject is classified as Category B if:“Its potential adverse environmental impacts on human populations or environmentallyimportant areas—including wetlands, forests, grasslands, and other natural habitats–are lessadverse than those of Category A projects.These impacts are site-specific; few if any of them areirreversible; and in most cases mitigation measures can be designed more readily than forCategory A projects. The scope ofEA for a Category B project may vary from project to project,but it is narrower than that of aCategory A Environmental Assessment (EA). As in a Category Aproject, the EA examines theproject’s potential negative and positive environmental impacts andrecommendsanymeasures needed to prevent, minimize, mitigate, or compensate for adverseimpactsandimprove environmental performance.

 

Policy OP/BP 4.04 – Natural Habitats

This safeguard seeks to support the protection and rehabilitation of natural habitatsassociatedwith Bank-financed projects. The Natural Habitats Policy is triggered by any project with thepotential to cause significant conversion (loss) or degradation of natural habitats,whetherdirectly (through construction) or indirectly (through human activities induced bythe project).Natural habitats are land and water areas where most of the original native plant and animalspecies are still present. Natural habitats comprise many types of terrestrial, freshwater, coastal,and marine ecosystems. They include areas lightly modified by humanactivities, but retainingtheir ecological functions and most native species.The Natural Habitats Policy distinguishes between critical and other natural habitats.Criticalnaturalhabitats are those natural habitats which are either: (i) legally protected, (ii)officially proposed for protection, or (iii) unprotected but of known high conservation. Banksupportedprojects must avoid significant conversion or degradation of any critical naturalhabitats. Theenvironmental assessment process (OP 4.01) should identify any critical naturalhabitatswithin a proposed project’s area of influence. For other (non-critical) natural habitats,the Natural Habitats Policy requires avoiding or minimizing damage to natural habitats to theextent feasible. If significant conversion or degradation of a non-critical natural habitat isneeded to achieve a project’s key objectives, the project must include mitigation measuresacceptable to the Bank.The policy also states that, “wherever feasible, Bank-financed projects are sited on lands alreadyconverted (excluding any lands that in the Bank’s opinion were converted in anticipation of theproject). The Bank does not support projects involving the significant conversion of naturalhabitats unless there are no feasible alternatives for theproject and its siting, and comprehensiveanalysis demonstrates that overall benefits fromthe project substantially outweigh theenvironmental costs.”

 

The BCRIP subprojects will not affect or degrade any natural habitats because the civil works forthe infrastructural sub-projects will be undertaken along existing roads, and will not traversecritical natural habitats or Protected Areas or Reserves. Therefore, none of theproposedworkswould result in significant degradation or conversion of natural habitats.Nevertheless, all will also include safety measures (such as speed bumps and speed limit signs)in areas that aredensely populated, near schools, or in the vicinity of protected areas and reserves. This safeguard is triggered based on the possibility that activities may affect natural habitats and the relatedmanagement measures to ensure rehabilitation of these areas.In addition, species of particular conservation concern such as the Jaguar and Baird’s Tapirrequire large areas of natural habitat for their survival and can be reasonably expected tooccasionally cross roads and highways in the four project locations. The endangeredYellow-headedParrot may also be seen as it flies over two of the project locations encompassed in itssizeable Belize home range. The endangered Central American River Turtle (Hicatee) occursmainly in large rivers and freshwater lagoons in Belize, and is more abundant in the BelizeRiver, and thus likely to occur in project locations that the Belize River traverses.

 

Policy OP/BP 4.11 – Physical Cultural Resources

This policy is intended to avoid or mitigate adverse impacts on physical cultural resources fromdevelopment projects financed by the World Bank. Physical cultural resources are defined (underthis policy) as “movable or immovable objects, sites, structures, groups of structures, naturalfeatures and landscapes that have archaeological, paleontological, historical, architectural,religious, aesthetic, or other cultural significance. Physical cultural resources may be located inurban or rural settings, and may be above ground, underground, or under water. Their culturalinterest may be at the local, provincial or national level, or within the international community.”The assessment and mitigation are done through theEnvironmental Assessment Process. ThisPolicy is applied to the project as a precautionary measure in case cultural resources areencountered as part of the environmental assessment process or during civil works. The BCRIP subprojects will not cause adverse impacts on knownphysical cultural resourcesbecause the civil works for the infrastructural sub-projects will be undertaken along existingroads. Any adverse impacts on physical cultural resources would have already been caused priorto the BCRIP. Nevertheless, chance finds procedures shouldbe incorporated into all sub-projectEMPs and civil works contracts. See Annex 3 for proposedchance find procedures wording.

 

Policy OP/BP7.60 – Projects in Disputed Areas

The territory of Belize has been claimed in whole or in part by Guatemala since 1940. In May2008, Belize and Guatemala signaled their acceptance of the OAS Secretary General’srecommendation to refer the territorial dispute to the International Court of Justice subjecttothewill of the people of Belize and Guatemala. On the 8 December 2008, the Ministers ofForeignAffairs of Belize and of the Republic of Guatemala signed the “Special Agreement to SubmitGuatemala’s Territorial, Insular and Maritime Claim to the International Court ofJustice” subject to the conduct of national referenda in both countries. The referenda have been completed with the latest held in Belize on May 8th 2019. As a result of the existence of Guatemala’s claim to Belizean territory, this policy is triggered asa precautionary measure.By supporting theBCRIP, the Bank does not intend to make any judgment on the legal or otherstatus of theterritories concerned or to prejudice the final determination of the competingparties’ claims.

7           Applicable World Bank Safeguard Policies

The parent Belize Climate InfrastructureProject (CRIP) was classified as a Category B project, as documented in the Environmental Management Framework (EMF) dated 2014, when six (6) Safeguards Policies were triggered, these were: OP/BP 4.01 Environmental Assessment;  OP/BP 4.04 Natural Habitats; OP/BP 4.11 Physical Cultural Resources; OP/BP 7.60  Projects in Disputed Areas, Indigenous Peoples OP/BP 4.10 and Involuntary Resettlement OP/BP 4.12.These policies will be applied to ensure that project funds are engaged in a manner consistentwith Bank institutional policies with respect to environmental protection and management.The applicability of these Safeguards Policies under the CERC as well as the requested expenditures under the EAP aredescribedin tables 1 and 2.

 

Table 1. World Bank Applicable Safeguard Policies

Parent project CERC Expenditures included in the EAP
Environmental Assessment – OP/BP 4.01
The Project is a Category B – Partial Assessment, assigned to projects that are likely to have localized, limited, and reversible environmental impacts. The BCRIP subprojects will not affect or degrade any natural habitats because the civil works for the infrastructural sub-projects will be undertaken along existing roads, and will not traverse critical natural habitats or Protected Areas or Reserves. Therefore, none of the proposed works would result in significant degradation or conversion of natural habitats. Nevertheless, construction sites will be rehabilitated and re-vegetated with native shrubs and trees. The BCRIP will also include safety measures (such as speed bumps and speed limit signs) in areas that are densely populated, near schools, or in the vicinity of protected areas and reserves. This safeguard is triggered based on the possibility that activities may affect natural habitats and the related management measures to ensure rehabilitation of these areas. In addition, species of particular conservation concern such as the Jaguar and Baird’s Tapir require large areas of natural habitat for their survival and can be reasonably expected to occasionally cross roads and highways in the fourproject locations. The endangered YellowheadedParrot may also be seen as it flies over two of theproject locations encompassed in itssizeableBelizehome range. The endangered Central American RiverTurtle (Hicatee)occursmainly in large rivers andfreshwater lagoons in Belize, and is more abundant intheBelizeRiver, and thus likely to occur in projectlocations that the Belize River traverse

 

 

The Project remains classified as Category B. Activities that could be classified as Category A are not eligible for financing under the CERC. A negative list (annex 2), which contains indicative ineligible expenditures is included in this ESMF. All activities included in the positive list of the CERC-OM (annex 1) will require an Environmental and Social Screening Process, as indicated in the ESMF, to determine the appropriate environmental and social risks and identify potential mitigation measures as needed.

 

The CERC expenditures in the EAP,will consist on a Positive list of goods and services, being these the following:

Direct assistance to beneficiaries:

•                     Cash transfer assistance to beneficiaries identified by Ministry of Human Development

•                     Cash transfers and/or Voucher/certificate to beneficiary farmers as identified by Ministry of Food & Agriculture

Goods:

•                     Personal Protective Gears and Equipment for farmers (masks, gloves, etc.)

•                     Sanitization supplies

•                     Agricultural equipment (small) and inputs (shade cloth, small scale irrigation materials for the rehabilitation of existing small-scale irrigation schemes, water storage devices/containers and rainwater harvesting including rainwater tanks, plastic mulch, seed, seedling nurseries,soluble and granular chemical fertilizers (the procurement and use of pesticidesis not allowed), green cover crops (seed), organic matter, harvesting trays, packaging, small machines, and domestic production of potting material);

•                     Poultry (poultry stock, feed, waterers, veterinary supplies, sanitization inputs);

•                     Livestock (feeding systems, pasture, water troughs, shade cloth, plastic drums for silage making, multi-nutritional blocks, lining and partial shade for ponds, forage harvesters/choppers, hay bailing equipment, citrus pellets, hay);

•                     Consulting services related to emergency response including, but not limited to urgent studies necessary to determine the impact of the emergency and to serve as a baseline for the recovery and reconstruction process, and support to the implementation of emergency response activities.

Works:

•                     additional Bank policies and procedures may be applicable, and additional Bank authorizations may be required (see annex 2)

 

An assessment of the sub-projects (BOOST and BCCAT) under the MHDSTPA Proposal did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes related to Cash Transfers, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety.

 

For the agricultural activities proposed under this CERC, some restrictions may apply as follow:

(i) the Borrower will avoid the manufacture, trade and use of chemicals and hazardous materials subject to international bans, restrictions or phaseouts;

(ii) the Borrower will not procure nor will use pesticides;

(iii) the Borrower will not build new wells nor will use water for irrigation purposes from surface water sources (streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands, reservoirs, and creeks, etc.); and,

(iv) all project activities shall be developed in already existing agriculturalactivities; no land shall be transformed for any of the project activities.

Natural Habitats – OP/BP 4.04
The BCRIP subprojects will not affect or degrade any natural habitats because the civil works for the infrastructural sub-projects will be undertaken along existing roads, and will not traverse critical natural habitats or Protected Areas or Reserves. Therefore, none of the proposed works would result in significant degradation or conversion of natural habitats. Nevertheless, all will also include safety measures (such as speed bumps and speed limit signs) in areas that are densely populated, near schools, or in the vicinity of protected areas and reserves. This safeguard is triggered based on the possibility that activities may affect natural habitats and the related management measures to ensure rehabilitation of these areas. In addition, species of particular conservation concern such as the Jaguar and Baird’s Tapir require large areas of natural habitat for their survival and can be reasonably expected to occasionally cross roads and highways in the four project locations. The endangered Yellow-headed Parrot may also be seen as it flies over two of the project locations encompassed in its sizeable Belize home range. The endangered Central American River Turtle (Hicatee) occurs mainly in large rivers and freshwater lagoons in Belize, and is more abundant in the Belize River, and thus likely to occur in project locations that the Belize River traverses. All project activities will be located on modified habitats within smallholder farmers; no activities will take place on key biodiversity areas, influence or buffer zones of protected areas, wetlands and natural grasslands. Livestock and agricultural activities shall be subject to further screening and assessment as described in this ESMF.
Physical Cultural Resources – OP/BP 4.11
Physical cultural resources may be located in urban or rural settings, and may be above ground, underground, or under water. Their cultural interest may be at the local, provincial or national level, or within the international community.” The assessment and mitigation is done through the Environmental Assessment Process. This Policy is applied to the project as a precautionary measure in case cultural resources are encountered as part of the environmental assessment process or during civil works. The BCRIP subprojects will not cause adverse impacts on known physical cultural resources because the civil works for the infrastructural sub-projects will be undertaken along existing roads. Any adverse impacts on physical cultural resources would have already been caused prior to the BCRIP. Nevertheless, chance finds procedures should be incorporated into all sub-project EMPs and civil works contracts. See Annex 3 for proposed chance find procedures wording. The project is not expected to have a negative impact onPhysical Cultural Resources, either tangible or intangible. Some project activities may involve soil excavations, for which chance finds procedures should be adopted and implemented. Any future CERC requests will be subject to further screening and assessment as described in this ESMF.
Projects in Disputed Areas – Policy OP 7.60
The territory of Belize has been claimed in whole or in part by Guatemala since 1940. In May 2008, Belize and Guatemala signaled their acceptance of the OAS Secretary General’s recommendation to refer the territorial dispute to the International Court of Justice subject to the will of the people of Belize and Guatemala. On the 8 December 2008, the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of Belize and of the Republic of Guatemala signed the “Special Agreement to Submit Guatemala’s Territorial, Insular and Maritime Claim to the International Court of Justice” subject to the conduct of national referenda in both countries. The referenda have been completed with the latest held in Belize on May 8th 2019.. As a result of the existence of Guatemala’s claim to Belizean territory, this policy is triggered as a precautionary measure. By supporting the BCRIP, the Bank does not intend to make any judgment on the legal or other status of the territories concerned or to prejudice the final determination of the competing parties’ claims. The CERC expenditures of the EAP will not support any activities that would result in activities that could impact or interfere use of land and livelihoods or involvement that could interfere, judge or legally refer on the territories concerned or to prejudice the final determination of the competing parties claim.
Indigenous Peoples OP/BP 4.10
The main communities to be affected by the

project are those that are located on or next to theprimary and secondary roads considered as

critical in each of the four target areas. All of

these communities with the exception ofBelmopan are considered rural communities.

Indigenous communities that have been identifiedhave been included because they all fall withinthe projects zone of influence. Of all thecommunities that are likely to be affected by theproject, seven are considered to be indigenouscommunities. Six are made up predominantly byindigenous Mayas and one by the Garifuna. Theseare all found in the Stann Creek and Toledodistricts. For this reason, a CulturallyAppropriate Planning Framework was developed.Direct impacts on these communities are unlikelygiven that there are no community membersliving on the road reserve. However, in theunlikely case that impacts are foreseen in thesubproject design, action plans will be preparedby which the GoB will ensure that communities’free, prior and informed consultation leading tobroad community support is achieved beforesubproject implementation.

The actions of this CERC, will not promote or create any type of impacts on this Safeguard OP/BP 4.10
Involuntary Resettlement OP/BP 4.12
The project is not expected to have major impacts on private land or livelihoods, especially given its focus on rehabilitation of existing infrastructure. However, it is possible that works such as river defense, drainage improvements, the rehabilitation and replacement of critical bridges and road improvements, could possibly elicit impacts such as (1) loss of property and assets due to displacements and relocation of individuals/families occupying road reserves related to road widening, diversion of  existing road and/or drainage purposes. Most of the encroachments on road reserves, and thus the highest proportion of related impacts, are inGreater Belize City Area; and (2) Loss of landand other assets (buildings, fences, crops, vendorstalls, driveways, signs etc.) from appropriation,removal, acquisition and demolition.The project’s involuntary resettlement policyframework has been prepared to guide thepreparation of resettlement plans in order tomitigate these impacts. As soon as subprojectsare identified and feasibility studies commence,the exact types and number of impacts will be

estimated and a resettlement plan(s) will be

prepared and implemented based on theframework’s guidelines.

The actions of this CERC, will not promote or create any type of impacts on this Safeguard OP/BP 4.12

 

Table2.  Main National Legal Instruments relevance to the project and WB Triggered Policies

Name of Act Date Relevance Relevant WB/OP
Environmental Protection Act and EIARegulations Rev 2000 Control and prevention of pollution on land, water and air, prohibitions on dumping of waste, environmental impact assessment and the control of nutrients deposited into the environment OP/BP 4.01
National Integrated Water Resources Act 2011 Management, controlled allocation and the sustainable use and protection of the water resources of Belize OP/BP 4.01
National Institute for Culture & History Act Rev 2000 Protection and conservation of ancient monuments and related matters. OP/BP 4.11
National Parks System Act 1982, (Rev 2000) Allows for the designation of national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, natural monument, and nature reserves. OP/BP 4.04
Wildlife Protection Act 1982 (Rev 2000) Protection for species of conservation concern. OP/BP 4.04
Public Roads Act Rev 2000 Authorizes the Chief Engineer to throw upon any lands adjacent or near thereto such earth, rubbish or materials as it shall or may be necessary to remove from the place of any work related to surveying, tracing, measuring, opening, constructing, repairing, altering, diverting, clearing, improving and excavating of any public road. OP/BP4.01
Mines & Minerals Act 1989 (Rev 2000) Controls activities such as dredging, prospecting and drilling OP/BP 4.01
Macal River HydroelectricAct 2003 Authorized the design, financing, construction and operation of the Chalillo Project OP/BP 4.37
Land Utilization Act Rev 1990 Provides for measures to govern use and development of land, and introduces measures for conservation of land and watersheds. OP 4.01 and

OP 4.04

8           Pertinent Environmental and Social Baseline

The location of the contingency activities under the CERC is national in scope, while the EAP under this CERC activation will be:

 

  • To allocate around US$13 millionto the MHDSTPA for a Social Protection Programme and specifically to fund a Vertical BOOST (Belize Conditional Cash Transfer) Programme and a Horizontal BOOST (Belize COVID-19 Cash Transfer (BCCAT)) Programme. Under the Vertical BOOST Programme funds will be supplied to fund the original BOOST Programme (2804 households) for a year, including a temporary vertical increase in payments for six months to smooth consumption. Under the Horizontal BOOST Programme, (BCCAT) funds will be used to assist an additional 10,500 households for six months. The details for the selection of beneficiaries, payments, and payment systems for the BCCAT Programme are being finalized.An assessment of the sub-projects (BOOST and BCCAT) under the MHDSTPA Proposal did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes related to Cash Transfers, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety.

 

  • The Ministry of Food and Agriculture and Immigration (MoFAI) has identified 5 major components with an allocation of US$ 8 million under the CERC; Component 1 provides relief to farmers who were severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, whereas component 4 provides relief to farmers who were severely impacted by the prolonged 2019 drought. Farmers assisted in component 1 cannot be assisted in component 4 and vice versa. Component 2, Post-harvest management, provides support to farmers and small farmer groups involved in vegetable production whereas component 3 supports all women registered in the BAIMS and all men farming <20 acres of land and are registered in the BAIMS. Component 5 will provide support to the technical and administrative team. The components are as listed below: Component 1 – USD 3.67 M – Market contraction caused by steep fall in demand; Component 2 – USD 0.48 M -Post Harvest Management; Component 3 – USD 1.34 M – Cash transfer; Component 4 – USD 2.37M -Drought relief; Component 5 – USD 0.11M -Technical Assistance.

 

9           Procedures to Address Environmental and Social Issues

The purpose of this ESMF is to ensure that the identified E&S risks under any CERC-financed activities are mitigated, controlled or eliminated through appropriate E&S risk management measures to be implemented throughout the life of Project. All potential activities included in the positive list of goods, services and worksof the CERC will need to apply the Environmental and Social Screening Process to determine the type of management measure needed. Depending on the type of activity, some subprojects will require to develop, implement, monitor and supervise an Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) which will be in line with this ESMF.This ESMP will require specific E&S management measures to be implemented depending on the activities to be financed under the CERC of the project. The detailed procedure to apply this ESMF is included in chapter 10 below. For the specific expenditures included under the EAP to be financed by this CERC activation, which consist mainly in the procurement and distribution by subsectors of farmers register in the BAIMS; these subsectors and the proposed activities are as listed below:

 

Table 3. Social Protection CERC activities

Product / Material Definition Specification # of Units Method Justification Volume & Unit Rate
Vertical BOOST Providing cash transfers to 3,106 beneficiaries 2804 NA Previous Experience For 12 months
Vertical Boost Providing cash transfers to 3,106 beneficiaries 2804 NA Previous Experience For 6 months
BCCAT Providing cash transfers to 10,500 beneficiaries 10,500 NA New Electronic Means For 6 months
BCCAT Assessment Costs MHDSTPA direct contracting Verification of Household information 60 assessors

 

An assessment of the sub-projects (BOOST and BCCAT) under the MHDSTPA Proposal did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes related to Cash Transfers, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety.

 

The activities for the agriculture sector are presented in the following tables, each addressing specific subsectors:

 

Table 4. Expenditure program for Poultry Farmers

Poultry Farmers
Farmer category based on USD loss Total USD loss per farmer category Compensation per unit loss per farmer (USD) Average Voucher Size (USD) Number of farmers in this category (Number) Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
<25,000 758,489.19 0.41 1,776.78 174 feeds, poultry stock, veterinary supplies, small machines, waterers, fencing materials, building materials and small storage and sanitization inputs 309,160.40

(40%)

>25,000 -50,000 716,417 0.38 14,237.65 19 Same as above 270,515.35 (35%)
>50,000 968,067 0.20 16,102.10 12 Same as above 193,225.25 (25%)
Total 2,442,973.19 205 196 9 772,901.00 (100%)

 

Table 5. Expenditure program for Beef Cattle Farmers

Beef Cattle Farmers
Total heads of cattle Total number of animals Compensation per animal head (USD) Average Voucher Size (USD) Total Number of Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
1-20 10,468 38.21 413.65 967 water tanks, feed, veterinarysupplies, forage choppers, fencing and shade materials, multi- nutritional blocks, water trough, grass seeds, small machines, small storage and sanitization inputs 400,000.00 (40%)
21-100 31,475 11.12 505.05 693 Same as above 350,000.00 (35%)
>100 57,244 4.37 1,388.89 180 Same as above 250,000.00 (25%)

 

Total 99,187 1,840 1,737 103 1,000,000.00

 

Table 6. Expenditure program for Pig Farmers

Pig Farmers
Total heads of pigs Total number of animals Compensation per animal head (USD) Voucher Size (USD) Total Number of Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
1-20 2,360 29.37 255.95 271 water tanks, feed, veterinarysupplies, fencing and shade materials, multi- nutritional blocks, water trough, grass seeds, small machines, small storage and sanitization inputs 69,362.26 (40%)
21-100 4,412 13.76 589.24 103 Same as above 60,691.97

(35%)

>100 6,432 6.72 2281.65 19 Same as above 43,351.41

(25%)

Total 13,204 393 348 45 173,405.64.00 (100%)

 

Table 7. Expenditure program for Sheep Farmers

Sheep Farmers
Total heads of sheep Total number of animals Compensation per animal head (USD) Average

Voucher Size (USD)

Total Number of Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
1-20 2,274 17.59 176.21 227 water tanks, feed, veterinarysupplies, forage choppers, fencing and shade materials, multi- nutritional blocks, water trough, grass seeds, small machines, small storage and sanitization inputs 40,000.00

(40%)

21-50 3,011 11.62 380.43 92 Same as above 35,000.00 (35%)
>50 7,837 3.18 454.55 55 Same as above 25,000.00 (25%)
Total 13,122 374 317 57 100,000.00 (100%)

Table 8. Expenditure program for Shrimp Farmers

Shrimp Farmers
Farm Size Limit (Acre) Average Voucher Size (USD) Number of farms in this category Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
100-400 18,633.86 7 Post Larvae and feeds 130,437.00
400> 34,781.50 2  Same as above 69,563.00
Total 200,000.00

 

Table 9. Expenditure program for Dairy Farmers

Dairy Farmers
Pounds of Milk Average Voucher Size (USD) Compensation per pound (USD) Number of farmers in this category (Number) Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
1-5,000 759.2 0.36 29 water tanks, feed, veterinarysupplies, forage choppers, fencing and shade materials, multi- nutritional blocks, water trough, grass seeds, small machines and small storage equipment, personal protective equipment and sanitization inputs 22,019.6 (40%)
>5,000-30,000 1,133.36 .07 17 Same as above 19,267.15 (35%)
>30,000 2,293.71 .04 6 Same as above 13,762.25 (25%)
Total 52 51 1 55,049 (100%)

 

Table 10. Expenditure program for Grain and Pulses Farmers

Grain and Pulses Farmers
Farm Size Limit (Size) acres Total Acreage Compensation per acre (USD) Average Voucher Size (USD) Number of farmers in this category Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
.002-20 5290 96.66 267.45 1,912 seeds, water storage devices, irrigation supplies, storage facilities, small machines and equipment, fungicides and fertilizers. 511,357.20 (40%)
21-100 5287 84.63 4,104.93 109 447,437.55 (35%)
>100 10,567 30.24 7,102.18 45 319,598.25 (25%)
Total 21,144 2,066 1,992 74 1,278,393.00 (100%)

 

Table 11. Expenditure program for Vegetable Farmers

Vegetable Farmers
Farm size (Acreage) Total acreage Compensation per acre (USD) Average Voucher Size (USD) Total Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD) Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
.005-0.505 19.57 2,184.46 527.78 81 108 3 shade cloth, small scale irrigation materials, tanks, plastic mulch, seed, seedling nurseries materials, water storage devices/containers, soluble and granular fertilizers, green cover crops {seed}, natural organic matter, harvesting trays, packaging trays, small equipment and machines $42,750.00 (45%)
>.505-1.005 13.55 2,103.3 1,900 15 Same as above $28,500.00 (30%)
>1.005 29. 818.9 1,583.33 15 Same as above $23,750.00 (25%)
Total 62.12 111 $95,000.00 (100%)

 

Table 12. Expenditure program for all Farmers and Beneficiaries

All Farmer and Beneficiaries
Number of items to be purchased Farmer groups Number of farmers in this category Number of males Number of females Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
8,436 1,405 1,376 29 Harvesting Crates 168,600.00
10 10 144 112 32 Wash tubs with troughs 10,500.00
10 10 144 112 32 Wash tubs with Drainers 12,500.00
10 10 144 112 32 Vegetable sorting and grading equipment 10,000.00
10,700 Disposable face masks 215,000.00
10 10 Heavy duty scales 4,000.00
8,500 L Hand Sanitizer 68,000.00
Total 488,600.00

 

 

 

Table 13. Expenditure program for Compensation to vegetable farmers simultaneously affected by drought and COVID-19 pandemic

Compensation to vegetable farmers simultaneously affected by drought and COVID-19 pandemic
Acreage size Total Acreage Compensation per acre

USD

Voucher Size (USD) Total Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
.005-0.505 276.57 1,987.50 633.15 868 shade cloth, small scale irrigation materials, tanks, plastic mulch, seed, seedling nurseries materials, water storage devices/containers, soluble and granular fertilizers, green cover crops {seed}, natural organic matter, harvesting trays, packaging trays, small equipment and machines 549,578.40 (40%)
>.505- 1.005 232.73 2,066.30 1.923.52 250 Same as above 480,881.10 (35%)
>1.005 438.02 784.18 1,951.63 176 Same as above 343,486.50 (25%)
Total 947.25 1,294 1286 26 1,373,946.00 (100%)

 

Table 14. Expenditure program for Compensation to Sugar Cane Farmers affected by Drought

Compensation to Sugar Cane Farmers Affected By Drought (1.0M)
Acreage size Total acreage Compensation per acre Voucher Size (USD) Total Farmers Male Female Items eligible with this voucher Budget Allocated to this category (USD)
0.1-10 13,493.89 33.35 207.28 2,171 seeds, water storage devices, irrigation supplies, storage facilities, small machines and equipment’s, biological control agent and fertilizers 450,000.00 (45%)
11-50 38,138.25 10.39 227.01 1,762 Same as above 400,000.00 (40%)
>50 17,245.37 8.61 914.63 164 Same as above 150,000.00 (15%)
Total 68,877.39 4,097 3,136 961 1,000,000.00 (100)

 

 

 

Table 15. Technical Assistance and Items to be Procured under Administration

Technical assistance and Items to be procured under Administration
Item Procurement method Amount Total cost USD
Project Assistant Individual Consultant 1 $15,000.00 (1250.00 monthly @ 12 months)
Temporary Administrative Assistant Individual Consultant 6 (1 per district) $30,000.00 (1000.00 Monthly @ 5 months)
Computer Request for Quote (RfQ) 4 $6,800.00
Printer 1 $5,655.00
Desk 7 $3,500.00
Chair 7 $2,100.00
4 drawer metal lockable filing cabinet 7 $2,800.00
Scanner 7 $5,250.00
20*40 tents RfQ 4 (per district) $1,800.00
White Folded Plastic Chairs RfQ 90 (15 per district) $5,850.00
Total                        78,755.00

 

Table 16. Operational Costs

Operational Costs
Description Unit Unit Cost USD Total USD
Fuel ($600 per month for district offices for 12 months) 12                                600.00                                     7,200.00
Bank Charges (printing of 5372 debit cards) 1                          12,500.00                                   12,500.00
Printing & Supplies (vouchers, toners, stationery etc. – $150 per month) 12                                150.00                                     1,800.00
Meetings (logistics, conference room and compute rental, catering etc. – 4 meetings per district x 6 districts) 24                                250.00                                     6,000.00
Travelling (subsistence, accommodation – 3 persons from main office for 2 times per month @ $765 per month for 10 months 10                                765.00                                     7,650.00
Telephone ($25 per month for 6 DAC for 12 months) 12                                150.00                                     1,800.00
Communication & visibility 1                            4,000.00                                     4,000.00
 Total operating costs                                   40,950.00

 

An assessment of the sub-project’s proposed activities as listed from the above referred tables (tables 4 to 16); did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes, than those expressed and specifically listed in table 2, for the Environmental Safeguards for this Belize CRIP-CERC, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety for workers and communities. For some activities and follow ups on environmental and social issues, there are templates for Activities Screening (annex 3); Risk Assessment (annex 4), and Environmental Management Plan template (annex 5)

10       Procedures to Address

Environmental and Social issues for the CERC Positive List

The purpose of these procedures are to: (i) determine whether activities proposed under potential future CERC activations are eligible and likely to have potential negative environmental and social risks and impacts; (ii)  identify appropriate mitigation measures for activities with adverse risks or impacts; (iii) incorporate mitigation measures in the implementation of the activity; (iv) review and approve the management plan and (v) monitor application of management plans for those activities requiring E&S due diligence. The procedures consist of the following 3 steps as described below:

 

10.1     Step 1. Application of E&S Screening Processes

The BCRIP-PMU will screen potential CERC activities in relation to eligibility (positive and negative lists) and to identify potential E&S risks and impacts and will classify each subproject according to risk. A sample Screening Form is included in Annex 1.

 

The Screening process will allow the BCRIP-PMU to:

  1. Determine the level of environmental work required (i.e. whether an Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) or other instrument is required; whether the application of simple mitigation measures will suffice; or whether no additional environmental work is required).
  2. Determine and incorporate appropriate mitigation measures for addressing adverse impacts.
  3. During the preparation of any sub-projects, the BCRIP-PMU will ensure that technical design can incorporate recommendations from the environmental and social assessment, including avoiding or minimizing environmental and social impacts, avoiding land acquisition.
  4. The BCRIP-PMU will retain a copy of the Safeguards Screening Summary for possible review by the Implementing Agency and the World Bank. The review, which may be conducted on sample basis, will verify the proper application of the screening process, including the scoping of potential impacts and the choice and application of instruments.

 

10.2     Step 2: E&S Assessment, Preparation, Consultation and Disclosure of Safeguards Instruments

If during the screening process it is identified that any of the activities to be financed under the CERC require E&S mitigation measures, the BCRIP-PMUwill identify and assess in further detail the potential E&S impacts of the proposed activities, evaluate alternatives, as well as design and implement appropriate mitigation, management and monitoring measures. These measures will be captured in the ESMP (or other E&S management instrument) which will need to be prepared. The BCRIP-PMU will prepare the ESMPs in consultation with affected peoples and with relevant partners, as necessary. A sample ESMP template which can be used for individual CERC sub-activities once identified during the screening is included in Annex 2. All ESMPs prepared for the project will be subject to review and approval of the World Bank.

 

Due consultation and broad community support must be documented and confirmed as part of the stakeholder engagement process for this CERC. Consultations will be adapted to adhere to public health recommendations i.e. social distancing, potentially virtual consultations or consultations by text message/phone for those without internet access.

 

10.3     Step 3: Review and Application of Safeguards Instruments

If prepared by a third-party, the ESMP will be submitted to the BCRIP-PMUfor review, prior to the submission to the World Bank for approval. The BCRIP-PMU will supervise and monitor the overall safeguards implementation process and prepare a progress report on the application of safeguards policies throughout the subproject cycle. The BCRIP-PMU will also develop the reporting requirements and procedures to ensure compliance. Appropriate mitigation measures will be included in the bidding documents and contract documents to be prepared by the BCRIP-PMU, as necessary.

11       Environmental and Social Management Measures applicable to the CERC EAP

Based on these E&S screening procedures, the EAP expenditures to be financed under this CERC activation (not only the Direct Assistance to Beneficiaries activities) to respond to the COVID-19 emergency recovery in Belize,have been assessed as moderate potential E&S and impacts.

 

The CERC ESMF is focusing on the following expenditures which will consist solely in:

 

To allocate around US$13 million to the MHDSTPA for a Social Protection Programme and specifically to fund a Vertical BOOST (Belize Conditional Cash Transfer) Programme and a Horizontal BOOST (Belize COVID-19 Cash Transfer (BCCAT)) Programme. Under the Vertical BOOST Programme funds will be supplied to fund the original BOOST Programme (2804 households) for a year, including a temporary vertical increase in payments for six months to smooth consumption. Under the Horizontal BOOST Programme, (BCCAT) funds will be used to assist an additional 10,500 households for six months. The details for the selection of beneficiaries, payments, and payment systems for the BCCAT Programme are being finalized. An assessment of the sub-projects (BOOST and BCCAT) under the MHDSTPA Proposal did not reveal any potential environmental nor social impacts under the proposed implementation processes related to Cash Transfers, as well as do not pose special impacts/risks on Occupational Health and Safety.

 

For the proposed agriculture activities, the CERC ESMF is focusing on the following expenditures which will consistof:

 

The assistance and support of beneficiary farmers with a total investment of USD 8 Million (see budget breakdown in table 16, bellow). The MoFAI will determine the eligible farmers registered in the BAIMS in which information such as GPS location of the farm, total farmland, water sources, commodities produced (crops and livestock), acreage and heads of animals, variety, production system, irrigation system, and farm gate price are already recorded in the system. The list of farmers benefiting from the activities will be displayed on the website of the MoFAI and at the district agriculture offices.

 

All farmers registered in the BAIMS who are involved in the selected value chains are eligible for Agriculture Emergency Assistance. Value chains include: (i) vegetables; (ii) pulse and grain; (iii) livestock; and (iv) shrimp. The list of selected commodities under the CERC are those that are severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and the 2019 drought.

 

Table 16. detailed breakdown of the budget activities

Expenditure Items Total Cost (USD)
Component 1:  Financial support to farmers provided through vouchers (Compensation to Farmers affected by Market contraction)
Poultry 772,901.00
Dairy 55,049.00
Vegetable 95,000.00
Cattle 1,000,000.00
Pigs 173,406.00
Sheep 100,000.00
Shrimp 200,000.00
Pulse and Grains 1,278,393.00
Subtotal 3,674,749.00
Component 2:  Post Harvest Management 488,600.00
Component 3:  Support to Small Farmers
Financial support to small farmers will be provided through cash transfer (Compensation to Farmers affected simultaneously by COVID-19 and Drought) 1,343,000.00
Component 4:  Support to farmers affected by drought
Vegetables 1,373,946.00
Sugar Cane 1,000,000.00
Subtotal 2,373,946.00
Total direct costs 7,880,295.00
Component 5. Technical Assistance and capacity building
Monitoring costs for the coordinating team (hiring of consultants, purchasing of computer, equipment, furniture, tents, and operating costs to cover fuel, telephone, traveling & subsistence, printing and supplies, bank charges, communication & visibility etc.)                                  119,705.00
TOTAL 8,000,000.00

 

12       Monitoring, Supervision and Reporting

The BCRIP-PMU already is committed to prepare and submit to the World Bank regular monitoring reports on the E&S performance of the CRIP Project, including but not limited to, stakeholder engagement activities and grievances log. For the current CERC activities monitoring protocols require verification by the PSC that GIIP around COVID-19 OHS and agricultural and animal husbandry waste. Management is being properly applied in relation to CERC financed activities and share such measures with both the BCRIP-PMU and World Bank. The format of this reporting is flexible and should be summarized at least quarterly. If there is additional CERC activation this process will be revisited to ensure action commensurate with the E&S risks and impacts.

13       Implementation Arrangements and Responsibilities

The Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (CRIP) Management Unit (PMU) of the Social Investment Fund (SIF) is the coordinating lead entity of CERC within the GOB. PMU is responsible for the preparation of the EAP and monitoring its day-to-day implementation with the support provided by other partners. PMU is also responsible for the overall implementation of CERC and shall be the focal point for all aspects related to procurement, financial management, disbursement, monitoring & evaluation, and safeguard compliance. Other GOB Ministries that possess the technical expertise to implement specific activities as agreed in the EAP will be required to support the PMU with the implementation and monitoring of all activities funded by CERC.

 

The Agriculture activities under this CERC: The MoFAI technical officer in collaboration with the District Agriculture Coordinator (DAC) will ensure coordination of activities with the beneficiary farmers as well as suppliers based on the implementation timelines. Information regarding the project activities coordinated by the MoFAI will be provided to SIF in a timely manner.

 

The printing of the serialized vouchers will be done by SIF; however, the signing of the vouchers will be done by the Chief Agriculture Officer (CAO) of the MoFAI. The SIF will deliver the vouchers to the CAO, thereafter CAO will hand over all vouchers to the DAC’s in their respective district for distribution to farmers. The DAC are ultimately responsible for coordination at the district level. The DAC will receive a package containing: (i) the serialized vouchers; (ii) the guidelines of implementation including the COVID-19 communication materials (leaflets, posters, etc.) and (iii) the list of beneficiaries with their BAIMS ID number.

 

The DAC will inform the recipients to visit the district office to collect their vouchers (by phone, taking into account COVID-19 guidelines for distribution). The DACs will also display the list of farmers benefiting from the vouchers (outside the office). Before issuing the vouchers, the DAC will ensure that the farmer presents a BAIMS identification or any other identification (picture and signature evident on ID) recognized by the GoB (adhering to COVID-19 guidelines). The DAC will write the name of the farmer, BAIMS Identification number and total value of the voucher. The farmer will also write and sign their name on the voucher in addition signing a master list containing the names of the various farmers receiving assistance under this program. The DAC will then sign the voucher and affix an Official Ministry of Food and Agriculture Stamp for authentication.

 

The DACs are responsible to collect a copy of the voucher for their records. The DACs are also responsible to collect the voucher with an attached invoice from the Supplier and submit all copies to the Accounts Section of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture in Belmopan for submission to SIF.  If the Supplier gives any non-eligible items to the farmers, the cost of the non-eligible items will NOT be considered for payment. The submission of vouchers to the Central Offices will be conducted bi-weekly/monthly.

 

The DACs will advise all farmers to redeem their relief voucher prior to the predetermined expiration date specified on the voucher. The agro-suppliers will not honor any certificate beyond the expiry date. Any vouchers not issued on or before the expiry date will be returned to the CAO with an explanation. The DAC is responsible to submit a copy of the sub-master list with the farmers’ signatures to the Director of Extension (DoE) and CAO and keep one for their records. The original master list bearing the farmers signatures will be provided to SIF through the Office of the Director of Projects. Additional information on this intervention can be found in the CERC OM in section H – Disbursement and Financial Management between paragraphs 56 to 68.

 

Technical Input:  The Line Ministries will provide technical assistance to the PMU in terms of monitoring the EAP implementation activities. PMU will be responsible for coordinating with the Line Ministries in accordance with the procedures described below:

 

  • Each Line Ministry will provide the technical specifications, the scope of work, estimated budget, schedule and other requirements associated with activities included in the EAP, and will participate in the subsequent evaluation activities;
  • PMU will review specifications, the scope of work, budget, schedule, terms, and conditions of employment, and prepare procurement documents according to the procurement plan specified in the EAP;
  • PMU can include, in the EAP, technical assistance in the form of consulting services for (i) developing the technical specifications, the scope of work, estimated budget, schedule, and other requirements, if the “in-house” capacity of the Line Ministries needs to be supplemented; and (ii) supervision of works and other activities included in the EAP. The technical consultants will work closely with the Line Ministries but report to PMU, as implementation coordinating agency of the CERC;
  • The Line Ministries shall provide reports related to safeguards compliance and all the other information required to monitor and evaluate the EAP implementation; and
  • If required, the PMU will bolster its EAP implementation supervision capacity through the engagement of technical consultants who would support the Line Ministries in the finalization of bidding documents and site supervision of activities as needed. The technical consultants will work closely with the Line Ministries but report to the PMU. The technical officials may be located within the SIF Main Office to support the PMU if necessary.

 

The Project Steering Committee (PSC), established under the auspices of the SIF, and composed of representatives from key Line Ministries is chaired by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Ministry of Economic Development and Petroleum (MEDP). The members of the PSC for the purpose of execution and implementation of EAP upon activation of this CERC are 1) MEDP; 2) Ministry of Finance (MOF); 3) Ministry of Human Development, Social Transformation and Poverty Alleviation (MHDSTPA); 4) Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration (MOFAI); and 5) SIF. The PSC should be available for meetings within twenty-four hours’ notice when necessary

The key responsibilities of the PSC are as follows:

 

  • Ensure the delivery of the EAP’s outputs and the attainments of outcomes by facilitating coordination amongst the Line Ministries and Institutions participating in the EAP and by addressing coordination issues as they arise during the implementation of the EAP;
  • Review EAP progress reports as submitted by the Project Coordinator and make a decision thereon; and
  • Assess all policy-related issues and guide as needed

 

Below is a table that summarizes the specific implementation steps associated with the EAP and the assigned responsibilities:

 

Table 17. Implementation Steps, with Assigned Responsibilities, Associated with EAP

Step Actions Responsible
1 The decision to Trigger Component 4 (Disbursement Category 4): In the event of a Declaration of Emergency, and following the preparation of a rapid need’s assessment, the MEDP/MOF will decide whether to trigger Component 4 – the CERC. MEDP/MOF
2 Preliminary Identification of Activities: Following MEDP’s decision to trigger Component 4, the PMU will coordinate with the line ministries to prepare a list of potential activities (CT, critical imports/subprojects) based on the results of the rapid needs assessment and annexed to the EAP.

Summary information on proposed activities, including the nature and amount of critical imports, the location, and type of the proposed emergency subprojects and their preliminary technical specifications, estimated costs, and safeguard implications would be produced and documented in the EAP.

2 weeks

PMU / Line Ministries (MHDSTPA and MOFAI)
3 Review of Eligibility of Proposed Activities: The PMU, with support from internal/ external safeguard specialist(s), will review the proposed activities for financing to ensure their eligibility in accordance with the criteria and safeguard policies as defined in the Loan Agreement and to apply safeguards screening processes as defined in the OM.

1 week

PMU
4 Selection of Activities for EAP: Based on the list of eligible activities reviewed, the PMU will finalize the EAP for submission to, and approval by, the Project Steering Committee (PSC).

1 week

PMU / PSC
5 Submission to the World Bank:  Once approved by the PSC, the EAP will be submitted to the World Bank for endorsement on a “no objection” basis.

1 week

MEDP / MOF / PMU
6 Approval by the World Bank: The Bank will review the trigger package and inform the Government on the approval to trigger the CERC.

2 weeks

WB
7 Procurement: Major activities under this step include, inter-alia, (i) finalization of technical specifications and bills of quantities for critical imports (supplies/ equipment) (ii) recruitment of a consultant/consulting firm for design/supervision of emergency subprojects or to perform other services relating to the emergency; and (iii) recruitment of contractors for implementation of emergency subprojects. PMU / Line Ministries
8 Implementation of EAP Activities:  Activities should be initiated within 10-15 days after the agreement or contract signing.

 

PMU / Line ministries for supervision
9 Financial Management (FM) and Progress Reporting: The PMU will follow the agreed-upon FM and reporting procedures for the EAP, as defined in the Loan Agreement and detailed in the OM. EAP FM reporting requirements will be harmonized with existing reporting procedures to limit the additional burden borne by the PMU.

Monthly monitoring and quarterly reporting

PMU
10 Monitoring and Evaluation: The oversight and reporting mechanisms established for the CRIP will also be applied to the EAP. An annually external financial audit firm will audit the annual financial statements of the whole Project, including those financed by Disbursement Category 4.

Annual Audit Report submitted in July of each year

PMU

14       Capacity Building

Worldwide the governments health sectors and related institutions have gained experience in infection prevention and control, healthcare waste management, communication and public awareness for emergency situations. As found across most countries, the capacity to manage risks associated with COVID-19 is a monumental challenge as the healthcare and other government servants and related professionals may not have the detailed know-how on the infectious risk management in diagnostic testing, quarantine and isolation centers for COVID-19 treatment and general care. Additionally, the communication process with the public and in handling social concerns around COVID19 as well as related measures, including quarantine is a catch-up process globally. By implementing the EAP under the CERC, the project will provide assistance and capacity building to support these critical initiatives and build upon international expertise to achieve international best practices on these matters

 

All project personnel mustbe trained on general awareness of EHS issues and specific procedures aimed at the avoidance of environmental damage as well as human health and safety. New staff, contractors, and visitors will be given basic induction training and follow Project EHS procedures. In lieu of this COVID-19 CERC activation, a set of trainings need to be targeted for the E&S due diligence around the CERC-PSC COVID-19 programs. Such targeted trainings must be focus on Infection Prevention and Control, general and health waste management and other OHS matters. To provide for other similar disaster situations a short training will also be dedicated to overall ESH issues for any other anticipated emergencies.

 

A detailed COVID-19 plan will be developed in the Project Implementation Manual to inform all agriculture emergency activities. The project will adopt a “Do Not Harm” approach: (i) understand how COVID-19 is transmitted and implement basic general preventative measures to protect oneself; and (ii) reduce the risk of spread of the virus during the implementation of emergency activities (see WHO guidance – COVID-19).  These measures include the following:

  1. Maintaining a physical distance – a minimum of 2 meters should be maintained between each person and the nearest person.
  2. Follow recommended hygiene practices, particularly hand washing with soap, respiratory etiquette (coughing or sneezing into a folded elbow or tissue, then immediately dispose of the tissue and wash your hands), and not touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.
  3. This approach will apply to all persons with whom the project works: DAC staff, service and input providers, local authorities, participating farmers, community members and input vendors.

 

The implementation of a “Do Not Harm” approach will include activities such as, but not limited to, the examples below:

  1. Setting up handwashing station facility and alternatives for hand washing: Setting up handwashing facilities in workplaces (entrances and strategic locations within sites, including rest areas, canteens, toilets, changing rooms, waste areas, shops, etc., not just offices).
  2. Establishing daily cleaning patterns: Provide for regular and thorough cleaning, using disinfectant, of food service facilities, canteens, eating areas, toilets/showers, common areas including door handles, floors and all surfaces that are regularly touched. Provide cleaning and disinfectant products for staff to wipe down surfaces, furniture, equipment and materials, that they may use. For equipment/materials, including mobile devices and writing instruments, the use of 70% isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol generally available in pharmacies) is recommended. For floors and surfaces, a 0.5% bleach solution is recommended.
  3. Support for workers with symptoms: The implementation manual will provide what to do if a worker presents or develops symptoms on site, including where they will be managed, what care will be provided, and by whom. The implementation manual will also set out how to clean up after any treatment or isolation of a symptomatic worker in the workplace, and how to deal with any waste generated during care.
  4. Consider how the movement of supplies, materials, food, water, cleaning equipment, etc. will affect safety and health in the workplace, and when it may become impossible to continue working.
  5. Vehicle hygiene for team travel in the field: Internal and external door handles, steering wheel and seats will be disinfected with a diluted solution of 4 teaspoons of bleach per liter of water. The conditions of intervention will be arranged to limit as much as possible the situations of coactivity.
  6. Ordering the necessary personal protective equipment (e.g. products for health checks according to MOH’s guidelines, alcohol-based hand disinfectant, water, soap and other items, such as masks, based on national or WHO guidelines) from the appropriate suppliers, based on estimated delivery times.
  7. Support for high-risk farmers: Farmers who are elderly or have pre-existing medical conditions should send a proxy to receive the necessary supplies.
  8. Inform suppliers and farmers: via radio spots and broadcasts, Facebook, WhatsApp on emergency activities and COVID-19 developments.

 

The distribution of inputs is particularly critical and is based on the recommendations of the World Food Program, the WB and the WHO for the COVID-19 approach; activities may include:

  1. Establishment of a supplier distribution site for the distribution of inputs to farmers that includes:
  2. contacting farmers to agree on the day and time of input collection to stagger arrival times to limit the number of people arriving at the same time. Do not allow crowds around the distribution point. Explain the flow and process at the distribution site, including the process and rationale for temperature controls. Explain to farmers that they should not go to the supplier if they are not feeling well;
  3. use audio or video recording of beneficiaries acknowledging receipt instead of collecting signatures.
  4. Assigning staff to ensure that participants maintain the recommended minimum distance between them (physical distance), according to WHO/MOH guidelines.  Also:
  5. setting up a handwashing area with an adequate supply of handwashing solution (0.05% bleach solution), ensuring that all incoming beneficiaries wash their hands;
  6. allocate areas for body temperature monitoring by health officials; and
  7. establish a sheltered/covered area for beneficiaries who are not licensed at the body temperature monitoring point. The allocated area should be large enough to allow beneficiaries to sit/stand at least one meter away from each other.
  8. Ensure that entry and exit points are clearly marked in the distribution area.
  9. Ensures that suppliers/DACs/farmers follow good hygiene practices and COVID-19 prevention protocols throughout the distribution.
  10. Establishing clear communication with beneficiaries at the distribution point on the following points:
  11. Hygiene promotion activities, including handwashing demonstrations, should be in place.
  12. COVID-19 messages should be introduced, materials on COVID-19 should be displayed/distributed.
  13. Explain the flow and process at the distribution site, including the process and rationale for temperature controls. If a beneficiary is detected as having fever, he or she should be directed to the specified sheltered/covered area for follow-up by the local government or health officer. Staff should inform identified beneficiaries that they will receive inputs regardless of the results of the temperature monitoring.
  14. Ask beneficiaries to maintain a distance of 2 meters from each other throughout the distribution process.
  15. Ask beneficiaries to leave the distribution site immediately after the collection of inputs.
  16. Once the input distribution is completed, the distribution point (room/area/tarp) is swept and sprayed with disinfectant (0.5% chlorine solution).
  17. Clean the hand washing station and remove/store the hand washing solution.
  18. Mandatory: All personnel at the distribution site must wash their hands and follow general hygiene practices.

 

The PMU will develop detailed and strict COVID-19 Standard Operating Procedures for all its activities and particularly for communication with beneficiaries, suppliers, DACs, communities and for the distribution of inputs (this will include guidance notes for DACs and suppliers). The PMU will ensure collaboration with local health services.

15       Stakeholder Engagement and Disclosure

The BCRIP EMF contained on itssection 6, a Dialogue and Disclosure Mechanism, that must be implemented into a more interactive Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Plan (SECP). This SECP must be emplaced by the BCRIP-PMU of the Social Investment Fund (SIF), in order to engage and communicate with stakeholders over the span of the World Bank Project. This consultation process is in place in order to interact and incorporate the viewpoints of Affected Parties. Special consideration is also directed to vulnerable groups, including with relation to engagement and consultative activities.

 

In terms of the CERC COVID-19 activation, the BCRIP-PMU must follow the guidance provided in WHO “Pillar 2: Risk Communication and Community Engagement” including, among others, existing guidance on Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE), guidance for preventing and addressing social stigma associated with COVID-19 and key messages and actions for COVID-19 prevention and control.

 

Overall, the activities of engagement for the BCRIP are guided by Good International Industry Practice (GIIP), as well as all applicable laws and regulations in Belize. The stakeholder engagement objectives continue to:

  • Promote the development of respectful and open relationships between stakeholders and the Project sponsors and other relevant parties across all phases of the project,
  • Identify Project stakeholders and understand their interests, concerns and influence in relation to Project activities, particularly during the construction phase,
  • Provide stakeholders with timely information about the Project, in ways that are appropriate to their interests and needs, and also appropriate to the level of expected risk and potential adverse impacts,
  • Support alignment with financing standards and guidelines for stakeholder engagement, as necessary; and
  • Record and resolve any grievances that may arise from Project-related activities through a Grievance Mechanism as outlined in Annex 7.

 

These processes are directly applicable to this CERC activation and will apply to both BCRIP-PMU and the PSC

 

 

Annex 1.  Positiveand negative list of goods, services and works

POSITIVE LIST
Item
Direct Assistance to Beneficiaries
  • Cash transfer assistance to beneficiaries identified by Ministry of Human Development
  • Cash transfers and/or Voucher/certificate to beneficiary farmers as identified by Ministry of Food & Agriculture and Immigration
Goods
·       Personal Protective Gears and Equipment for farmers (masks, gloves, etc.)

·       Sanitization supplies

·       Equipment, tools and supplies for agriculture(including rainwater harvestingandrehabilitation of existing irrigation schemes)

·       Feed and veterinary inputs (vaccines, vitamin tablets, etc.)

·       Livestock, poultry

·       Agricultural inputs such as Seeds, fertilizers etc.

·       Computers and related equipment (laptops, printers, scanners)

·       Office furniture and equipment (desks, chairs, filing cabinet, tents)

Services
·       Consulting services related to emergency response including, but not limited to urgent studies necessary to determine the impact of the emergency and to serve as a baseline for the recovery and reconstruction process, and support to the implementation of emergency response activities.
Works[4]

 

 

Annex 2.Negative List for CERC Expenditures

Negative List of Goods and Services
·       Activities of any type considered as projects – new construction without detailed ESIA/ESMPs

·       Activities that would require new land or transformation of the land-use.

·       Activities that have potential to cause any significant loss or degradation of critical natural habitats whether directly or indirectly.

·       Activities that could adversely affect forest and forest health.

·       Activities that could affect sites with archaeological, paleontological, historical, religious, or unique natural values.

·       Activities that will result in the involuntary taking of land, relocation of households, loss of assets or access to assets that leads to loss of income sources or other means of livelihoods, and interference with households’ use of land and livelihoods.

·       Activities that include the construction of new wells and/or new irrigation schemes.

·       Water for irrigations purposes shall come from surface water (streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands, reservoirs, and creeks, etc).

·       The procurement and use of pesticides arenot allowed.

·       Use of goods and equipment on lands abandoned due to social tension / conflict, or the ownership of the land is disputed or cannot be ascertained.

·       Use of goods and equipment to demolish or remove assets, unless the ownership of the assets can be ascertained, and the owners are consulted.

·       Uses of goods and equipment involving forced labour, child labour, or other harmful or exploitative forms of labour.

·       Uses of goods and equipment for activities that would affect indigenous peoples, unless due consultation and broad support has been documented and confirmed prior to the commencement of the activities.

·       Uses of goods and equipment for military or paramilitary purposes.

 

Annex 3. Screening Form for Potential Environmental and Social Issues

This form is to be used by the BCRIP – Project Management Unit (PMU) to screen for the potential environmental and social risks and impacts of a proposed subproject. It will help the PMU in identifying the relevant Safeguards policies, establishing an appropriate E&S risk rating for these subprojects and specifying the type of environmental and social assessment required, including specific instruments/plans. Use of this form will allow the PMU to form an initial view of the potential risks and impacts of a subproject. It is not a substitute for project-specific E&S assessments or specific mitigation plans.

 

Subproject Name
Subproject Location
Subproject Proponent
Estimated Investment
Start/Completion Date

 

 

Questions Answer Safeguards Policies Relevance Applicable

Instruments

Yes no
Does the subproject involve civil works including new construction, expansion, upgrading or rehabilitation of healthcare facilities and/or waste management facilities? ESIA/ESMP
Does the subproject involve land acquisition and/or restrictions on land use? RAP
Does the subproject involve acquisition of assets for quarantine, isolation or medical treatment purposes?
Is the subproject associated with any external waste management facilities such as a sanitary landfill, incinerator, or wastewater treatment plant for healthcare waste disposal? ESIA/ESMP
Is there a sound regulatory framework and institutional capacity in place for healthcare facility infection control and healthcare waste management? ESIA/ESMP
Does the subproject have an adequate system in place (capacity, processes and management) to address waste?
Does the subproject involve recruitment of workers including direct, contracted, primary supply, and/or community workers?
Does the subproject have appropriate OHS procedures in place, and an adequate supply of PPE (where necessary)?
Does the subproject have a Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM) in place, to which all workers have access, designed to respond quickly and effectively?
Does the subproject involve transboundary transportation (including Potentially infected specimens may be transported from healthcare facilities to testing laboratories, and transboundary) of specimen, samples, infectious and hazardous materials? ESIA/ESMP
Does the subproject involve use of security or military personnel during construction and/or operation of healthcare facilities and related activities? ESIA/ESMP
Is the subproject located within or in the vicinity of any ecologically sensitive areas? ESIA/ESMP
Are there any indigenous groups (meeting specified ESS7 criteria) present in the subproject area and are they likely to be affected by the proposed subproject negatively or positively? Indigenous Peoples Plan/other plan reflecting agreed terminology
Is the subproject located within or in the vicinity of any known cultural heritage sites? ESIA/ESMP
Does the project area present considerable Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) risk? ESIA/ESMP
Is there any territorial dispute between two or more countries in the subproject and its ancillary aspects and related activities? OP7.60 Projects in Disputed Areas Governments concerned agree
Will the subproject and related activities involve the use or potential pollution of, or be located in international waterways[5]? OP7.50 Projects on International Waterways Notification

(or exceptions)

 

 

Conclusions:

  1. Proposed Environmental and Social Risk Ratings (High, Substantial, Moderate or Low).

 

Provide Justifications.

 

  1. Proposed E&S Management Plans/ Instruments.

 

Annex 4. Environmental and Social Risks and Mitigation Measures during CERC implementation

Activities

Farm Works

Maintenance/Upgrades


Potential E&S Issues and Risks
Proposed Mitigation Measures Responsibilities Timeline Budget
Clearing of vegetation and

Construction activities near ecologically sensitive areas/spots

Impacts on natural habitats, ecological resources and biodiversity
General construction activities Foundation excavation; borehole digging –        Impacts on soils and groundwater;

–        Geological risks;

General construction activities – –        Resource efficiency issues, including raw materials, water and energy use;

–        Materials supply

General construction activities – general pollution management –        Construction solid waste;

–        Construction wastewater;

–        Noise;

–        Vibration;

–        Dust;

–        Air emissions from construction equipment

General construction activities – hazardous waste management –        Fuel, oils, lubricant, fertilizers
Use of fertilizers –        Use, storage and disposal of fertilizers and containers

–        Infiltration of chemicals into soil and water sources.

Selection of seeds and species for agricultural purposes –        Change on selection of already existing crop species (agriculture and aquaculture)

–        Use of invasive species

Soil preparation –        Erosion and disruption of soil structure
OHS in agriculture –        Accidents and injuries of farmers

–        Using adequate PPE according to activities

–        Disposal of packaging wastes of supplies

General construction activities – Labor issues –        Labor issues

 

–        Refer to LMP[6]
General construction activities – Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) –        Waste management;

–        Construction; wastewater;

–        Noise;

–        Vibration;

–        Dust;

–        Air emissions from construction equipment;

–        Use of appropriate PPE as well as implement guidance for COVID-19

General construction activities- traffic and road safety –        Waste management

–        Construction wastewater;

–        Noise;

–        Vibration;

–        Dust;

–        Air emissions from construction equipment

–        COVID-19 transmission (Use of appropriate PPE as well as implement guidance for COVID-19 and implement distancing practices)

 

General construction activities – security personnel N.A.
General construction activities – land and asset –        Acquisition of land and assets
General construction activities – Labor –        Labor influx

–        Worker’s camp

General construction activities – –        GBV/SEA[7] issues
General construction activities – cultural heritage –        Cultural heritage Chance-finds procedure
General construction activities – emergency preparedness and response –        PPE for COVID-19 prevention
Construction activities related to onsite waste management facilities, including temporary storage, incinerator, sewerage system and wastewater treatment works –        No incineration,

–        temporary waste management of materials.

–        reuse and recycle

Construction activities related to demolition of existing structures or facilities (if needed) –        temporary waste management of materials.

–        reuse and recycle

 

Environmental and Social Management Plan Template

Depending on the result of the Screening Process, the PMU will need to develop an Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP), setting out how the environmental and social risks and impacts will be managed through the project lifecycle of a CERC financed activity. This ESMP template includes several sections to identify key risks and set out suggested E&S mitigation measures, as well as an environmental and social baseline. The PIU can use the matrix to assist in identifying risks and possible mitigations.

 

The ESMP should also include other key elements relevant to delivery of the subproject, such as institutional arrangements, plans for capacity building and training plan, and background information. The PIU may incorporate relevant sections of the ESMF into the ESMP, with necessary updates.

 

The matrices illustrate the importance of considering lifecycle management of E&S risks, including during the different phases of the project identified in the ESMF: planning and design, construction, operations and decommissioning.

 

The WBG EHS Guidelines, International Finance Corporation (IFC) of the WBG technical guidance documents and other GIIPs set out in detail many mitigation measures and good practices, and can be used by the PIU to develop the ESMP. Proper stakeholder engagement should be conducted in determining the mitigation measures, including close involvement of medical and healthcare waste management professionals.

 

Key Activities
Potential E&SRisks and Impacts
Proposed Mitigation Measures Responsibilities Timeline Budget
During activity

Preparation

         
During activity

Implementation

         
During activity

Supervision

         
During activity

Decommissioning

         

 

Indicative Content of the Environmental and Social Management Plan of the subprojects

A scheme is presented below that will be adjusted at the beginning of the implementationof the subprojects by the Environmental and Social Management Team of the project in coordination with the PMU.The Environmental and Social Management Plans of the subprojects will be prepared following the ESMF guidelines and must respond to the specific characteristics of the risks andimpacts identified for each subproject, social and cultural conditionsofthebeneficiaries and the environmental characteristics of where the subprojects will be carried out.

  1. General Information

1.1. Project Responsible

1.2 Location

1.4. Subproject description

1.5. Environmental and Social baseline and use of maps and images relevant to the project

  1. Measures for the use of fertilizers

2.1. Description of fertilizer to be use

2.2. Safe use and storage of fertilizers

2.3. Individual Protection Equipment needed

  1. Soil protection measures

3.1. Good farming practices

3.2. Soil improvement

  1. Water resources

4.1. Rehabilitation of Irrigation schemes

4.3. Contamination of water sources

4.4. Water use and ecological flow

  1. Measures for the protection of ecosystems, habitats or ecosystem services, fauna and flora.

5.1. Biological corridors, Protected Areas, IBA / KBA.

5.2. Ecosystem service provider areas.

5.3. Forest Management

5.4. Forest fire control

  1. Protection measures related to social aspects

6.1. Labor matters

6.2. Livelihoods

  1. Measures for the protection of cultural heritage
  2. Livestock good practices and measures
  3. Consultations
  4. Implementation arrangements
  5. Monitoring arrangements
  6. Budget and schedule
  7. Grievance Mechanism

 

Annex 5. Guidelines forUsages of PPE for Prevention

Sequence for adequate donning and removing PPE[8]

 

Annex 6. Helpful Resources for Covid-19 Pandemic Planning and Management

 

Helpful Resources for Covid-19 Pandemic Planning and Management
WHO Guidance

Advice for the public

WHO advice for the public, including on social distancing, respiratory hygiene, self-quarantine, and seeking medical advice, can be consulted on this WHO website: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

Technical guidance

Infection prevention and control during health care when novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection is suspected, issued on 19 March 2020

 

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak: rights, roles and responsibilities of health workers, including key considerations for occupational safety and health, issued on 18 March 2020

 

Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) Action Plan Guidance COVID-19 Preparedness and Response, issued on 16 March 2020

 

Considerations for quarantine of individuals in the context of containment for coronavirus disease (COVID-19), issued on 19 March 2020

 

Operational considerations for case management of COVID-19 in health facility and community, issued on 19 March 2020

 

Rational use of personal protective equipment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), issued on 27 February 2020

 

Getting your workplace ready for COVID-19, issued on 19 March 2020

 

Water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management for the COVID-19 virus, issued on 23 April 2020

 

Safe management of wastes from health-care activities issued in 2014

 

Advice on the use of masks in the community, during home care and in healthcare settings in the context of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, issued on March 19, 2020

 

Preparation of National Health-Care Waste Management Plans in Sub-Saharan Countries, issued on 2005

 

How to Put On and Take Off Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), issued on 22 April 2020

WORLD BANK GROUP GUIDANCE

ESF/Safeguards Interim Note: COVID-19 Considerations in Construction/Civil Works Projects, issued on April 7, 2020

 

Technical Note: Public Consultations and Stakeholder Engagement in WB-supported operations when there are constraints on conducting public meetings, issued on March 20, 2020

 

Technical Note: Use of Military Forces to Assist in COVID-19 Operations, issued on March 25, 2020

Technical Note on SEA/H for HNP COVID Response Operations

 

Interim Advice for IFC Clients on Preventing and Managing Health Risks of COVID-19 in the Workplace, issued on April 6, 2020

 

Interim Advice for IFC Clients on Supporting Workers in the Context of COVID-19, issued on April 6, 2020

 

IFC Tip Sheet for Company Leadership on Crisis Response: Facing the COVID-19 Pandemic, issued on April 6, 2020

Environmental, Health, and Safety General Guidelines

 

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

ILO GUIDANCE

ILO Standards and COVID-19 FAQ, issued on March 23, 2020 (provides a compilation of answers to most frequently asked questions related to international labor standards and COVID-19)

OTHER GUIDANCE

CDC Group COVID-19 Guidance for Employers

 

 

Annex 7: Grievance Redress Mechanism

A GRIEVANCE REDRESS MECHANISM FOR THE COVID-19 RELIEF PROGRAMS IN THE CERC

 

Purpose of Mechanism:

The Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM) is the official process by which individuals directly affected by GoB’s COVID-19 Relief Programs (i.e. The Social Protection Program and Agricultural Support Program) can bring their queries, complaints, concerns, and grievances to the five (5) agencies that are engaged to implement such programs for resolution. The agencies are the Project Management Unit of BSIF (PMU), the Ministry of Human Development (MHD), the Ministry of Food, Agriculture& Immigration (MoFAI), National Bank of Belize (NBB), and Digi (Belize Telemedia Limited).

 

Structure of the GRM:

The Grievance Redress Mechanism is designed as a mechanism which will be community focused and participatory. The structure and process flow for the GRM can be examined in Attachments 1 and 2. Complaints from individuals will be accepted by the Ministry of Human Development, the Ministry of Agriculture, the National Bank of Belize, Belize Telemedia (Digi) and the Project Management Unit in BSIF. For persons not satisfied with the grievance mechanism, there is a separate avenue they can pursue which is the Ombudsman’s Office or the Judicial System including the Magistrate and Supreme Courts. This avenue is being recommended particularly in relation to cases of a criminal nature. In all instances, it will be responsibility of the respective agencies for the registration and sorting of all complaints. All complaints will be recorded in a grievance database at each receiving agency and copied to the PMU.

 

Administrative Procedures:

Step 1- Registration

This step includes the acceptance of a complaint by  the participating entities through any of the following modes: telephone (hotlines), walk-ins, email, among others to  be recorded and responded to by the respective agencies in compliance with the main elements of a spreadsheet which is the template for the preparation and submission of  bi-weekly reports to the PMU. A copy of the spreadsheet can be examined at Attachment 3.

 

Four (4) of the participating entities (NBB, Digi, MoFAI, and PMU) will be utilizing Microsoft Dynamic 365 as the software of choice for their complaint mechanism, while the MHD will be utilizing a software of its choice.  Nonetheless, it should be noted that the contents of the bi-weekly reports submitted by all entities to the PMU will be in compliance with the framework of the google spreadsheet. A copy of all complaints and resolutions will be submitted to the PMU by participating entities on a bi-weekly basis.

 

Step 2- Institutional Responsibilities: Sorting and Processing of Complaints:

This step determines whether a query or complaint is eligible for the grievance mechanism. Dependent on the agency receiving the complaint, and coupled with the nature of the complaint, below is a table outlining the types of possible complaints and grievances that are expected to be  dealt with by the respective entities involved in the GRM along with a listing of  intake mechanisms, level of complexity, and tentative timeframe for their resolution for each agency.Various aspects of the sorting and processing of complaints are captured in the google spreadsheet which can be examined at Attachment 3.

 

Agency receivingcomplaints Types of queries, concerns, complaints, grievance etc Intake

Mechanism

Level of complexity of concerns, complaints, grievance etc Timeframefortheirresolution
National Bank of Belize (NBB) Ø  Queries about banking transactions, and account balances Hotline

Email

 

 

Low/moderate

 

 

Within a few hours (<1-2 hours)

 

 

Ø  Complaints or grievance about banking transactions and account balances Ditto Moderate/high Withinone (1) businessday
BelizeTelemedia (Digi) Ø  Queries related to how one uses the Mobile Wallet to access relief funds Hotline

Email

Low/moderate Within a fewhours

 

Ø  Queries related to where a person should go to cash out their funds

 

Ditto Low/moderate

 

Within a fewhours

 

Ø  Queries related to what should a person do if they had forgotten their account number

 

Ditto Low/moderate

 

Within a fewhours

 

Ø  Queries related to checking account balance

 

Ditto Moderate/high

 

1-4 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaints related to beneficiaries not receiving their funds, or receiving an incorrect amount from the Agent

 

Ditto Moderate/high

 

1-4 businessdays

 

Ø  Queries related to authentication codes to process a transaction or SMS confirmations after the processing of a transaction Ditto Moderate/high

 

1-4 businessdays

 

Ministry of Human Development Ø  Queries related to the eligibility determination – how does one know if they qualify for the BCCAT program* Hotline

Email

Walk-In

 

Low

 

 

Within a fewhours

 

 

 

Ø  Queries related to payment dates Ditto

 

Moderate/high

 

1-4 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaints or queries related to payment amounts

 

Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Query related to the duration of the benefit under the BCCAT program

 

Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  What should a BCCAT beneficiary do if their Agent informed them that no funds are available

 

Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  What should a beneficiary do if they found out that an unauthorized person is collecting benefits in their name Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Complaints related to allegations of fraud

 

Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment of gender-based violence

 

Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Complaintsrelatedtodiscrimination Ditto

 

High 5-10 businessdays
Project Management Unit (BSIF) Ø  What should a beneficiary do if their Agent informed them that no funds are available Hotline

Email

Walk-In

Moderate/high 1-4 businessdays
Ø  What should a beneficiary do if they found out that someone is collecting benefits in their name Ditto

 

High

 

5-10 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaints related to allegations of fraud Ditto

 

High

 

5-10 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment of gender-based violence

 

Ditto

 

High

 

5-10 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaintsrelatedtodiscrimination Ditto

 

High

 

5-10 businessdays

 

Ø  Complaints against program staff or other Project-related personnel

 

Ditto

 

High

 

5-10 businessdays

 

Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Immigration Ø  Queries related to farmer eligibility criteria Hotline

Walk-In

Low Within a fewhours
Ø  Queries related to agro-suppliers selection criteria Ditto Low Within a fewhours
Ø  Queries related to why some farmers are getting higher compensation than others

 

Ditto Low Within a fewhours
Ø  Queries related to timeframe for voucher distribution Ditto Low Within a fewhours
Ø  What can be done if an agro supplier ran out of a particular input and the voucher is near its expiration date Ditto Medium 1-2 businessdays
Ø  A farmer is unable to collect their funds or inputs and want someone to collect it on their behalf Ditto Medium 1-2 businessdays
Ø  What should person do if they did not receive their voucher or funds Ditto Low/Moderate 1-2 businessdays
Project SteeringCommittee Ø  Complaints related to allegations of fraud Hotline

Email

High 5-10 business
Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment and gender-based violence Ditto High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Complaintsrelatedtodiscrimination Ditto High 5-10 businessdays
Ø  Complaints against program staff or other project-related personnel Ditto High 5-10 businessdays

Note: * See Attachment :4 Procedures for appealing BCCAT ineligibility status

 

Step 3- Acknowledgement:

When a complaint is registered, the In-Take Officer in the respective agency will issue a formal response and acknowledgement to the complainant within 48 hours regardless of the nature of the complaint as outlined in the GRM Process Flow Chart at Attachment 2.

 

Step 4- Action Taken

The Tier Levels of the GRM are:

  • Tier 1: Agency Level
  • Tier 2: Project Management Unit Level
  • Tier 3: Project SteeringCommitteeLevel
  • Legal Authorities (Ombudsman, Magistrate/Supreme Courts) are options available outside the formal GRM

The table below outlines the Tier Levels of the GRM, along with a general typology of the queries and complaints for each Tier, their level of complexity, and tentative timeframe for resolution.

 

TierLevel Types of Queries, Complaints Level of Complexity TentativeTimeframeforResolution
Tier 1: Agency Level Ø  Transactional Queries

Ø  Customer Information

Ø  Program Eligibility

Ø  Accounts Number/Balance

Low/Moderate < 24 hours- 4 businessdays
Tier 2: PMU Level Ø  Allegation of Fraud

Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment and gender-based violence

Ø  ComplaintsrelatedtoDiscrimination

High 5-10 businessdays
Tier 3: PSC Level Ø  Allegation of Fraud

Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment and gender-based violence

Ø  ComplaintsrelatedtoDiscrimination

Ø  Complaints against program staff or other project-related personnel

High 5-10 businessdays
The Legal Authorities Ø  Allegation of Fraud

Ø  Complaints related to sexual harassment and gender-based violence

Ø  Complaintsrelatedtodiscrimination

High 10 or more businessdays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment 1:  GRM Structure

 

Project Stakeholders

General Public; NGOs; Sector Stakeholders; Program Applicants; Beneficiaries; etc. Sector

Complainants
Receiving Agency:
Ministry of Agriculture
Ministry of Human Development

(SP)

National Bank of Belize

(SP)

Belize Telemedia (Digi)

(SP)

Project Management Unit
Project Steering Committee
Legal Authority/

Ombudsman

Phone; Walk-ins
Grievance Sorting, Processing &Verification, Investigation & Action
Escalated Cases
Cases for Legal Review

 

 

Attachment 2: Process Flow

 

 

 

Attachment3: Google Spreadsheet for sorting GRM Queries

 

 

Validation form for Google Spreadsheet

 

 

Attachment 4:Procedures for individuals appealing their BCCAT ineligibility status

  1. Process for Partnering agencies: NBB, BSIF, DIGI

All grievances regarding individuals appealing their ineligibility status must be referred to MHDSTPA for action. During registration of the compliant, the Intake officer/Agent for the partnering agencies must acknowledge receipt of complaint and record the following:

  1. Full Name of the individual
  2. MIS# (Unique number given to all households assessed)
  3. Contactnumber
  4. District (where the individual lives)

The information shall be submitted to the BCCAT representative within their agency utilizing their internal systems. The Intake officer/Agent will inform the Complainant that a correspondence regarding their grievance has been reported to the MHDSTPA for follow-up action. The Intake officer/Agent will inform the Complainant that a MHDSTPA representative will call within two business days.

During the closing of the grievance, the Intake officer/Agent shall provide the MHDSTPA Hotline number to the Complainant and inform the individual that they should call the number if two business days elapse without a follow-up call from MHDSTPA.

The BCCAT representative within the partnering agency will submit grievance via email to the MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point for action.

 

  1. Processfor MHDSTPA

At the end of the Verification and Enrolment phase ineligible households will be notified of their status via a customized SMS blast stating the following:

“Dear XXX, we are sorry to tell you that you have not qualified for the COVID CAsh Transfer Program. If you want to appeal, please call MHD on NNN-NNNN.”

In-Bound calls

The Intake Officer will receive call, inform the Complainant that an Administrative review of their status will be conducted, the details of the Administrative review process and its duration. The IntakeOfficerwillrequestfor the followinginformation:

  1. Full Name of the individual
  2. MIS# (Unique number given to all households assessed)
  3. Contactnumber

The Intake Officer will search in the Single Information System for Beneficiaries (SISB) for the Complainant’s household assessment using the information outlined above. The Intake Officer will make the assessment incomplete, and verify the home address of the Complainant and household characteristics and assets. The outcome of the verification, whether the information is recorded correctly or an administrative error was found in SISB, the following procedure shall be carried out by the Intake Officer.

  1. The Intake Officer will save the information by making the assessment complete and process the Administrative review form.

Administrativereviewform

  1. The Intake Officer will inform the Complainant that a MHDSTPA representative will return a call regarding the outcome of the administrative review within 5 business days.
  2. The MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point will review the Administrative Review cases and submit for rescoring by the Policy and Planning Unit.
  3. The household assessment will be rescored using the Proxy-Means Test (PMT) which uses a special algorithm to measure a household’s poverty level. After the rescoring, the following process will take effect base on outcome of scoring and prioritization of categorical criteria:
    1. Eligible
      1. A MHDSTPA representative will call the Complainant regarding their provisional selection, request for the necessary verification documents.
      2. Enrolment into the BCCAT program will be completed as normal after the submission of documents.
    2. Ineligible
      1. A MHDSTPA representative will provide the Complainant with a formal response regarding their ineligibility and why via phone call.

 

 

Referrals and Out-Bound

Referrals received from partnering agencies will be filtered to the respective district offices base on Complainant’s location. The Intake Officer will call the Complainant and carry out the steps mentioned above during In-Bound call.

In program: Complaints and request for updating of information

Low complexity queries with short response time will be addressed by all agencies through the utilization of a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) guide that will be posted within the respective offices.

Complaintsregardingpayment:

  1. Process for Partnering agencies: NBB, BSIF, DIGI

All complaints regarding payment amount that a household is entitled to shall be referred to MHDSTPA. the Intake officer/Agent for the partnering agencies must acknowledge receipt of complaint and record the following:

  1. Full Name of Payee
  2. MIS#
  3. Contactnumber
  4. District (where the Payee lives)

The information shall be submitted to the BCCAT representative within their agency utilizing their internal systems. The Intake officer/Agent will inform the Complainant that a correspondence regarding their complaint has been reported to the MHDSTPA for follow-up action. The Intake officer/Agent will inform the Complainant that a MHDSTPA representative will call within one business day.

The BCCAT representative within the partnering agency will submit grievance via email to the MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point for action.

MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point will review household assessment in SISB to ascertain the HH member composition and individual payment. The two-payment method, as seen below, will be reapplied through the system, whichever is the highest will be applied.

  1. Payment method A = Increase current payment to new payment floor of $150
  2. Payment method B= Current Payment + 20%

A formal response to the Complainant will be issued by the MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point or any other authorized MHDSTPA representative regarding the payment method applied to determine the entitled payment amount within 1 business day.

 

 

  1. Processfor MHDSTPA

The Intake Officer will receive call and request for the following information:

  1. Full Name of Payee
  2. MIS#
  3. ContactNumber
  4. Districtcallingfrom

Information will be recorded in MHDSTPA online case management database known as FAMCare. Intake Officer will document complaint in the system using the “Query” function. The Intake Officer will notify the Complainant that a MHDSTPA representative will provide a formal response via phone call within 1 business day.

Steps mentioned above to determine the payment amount a HH is entitled to will be implemented.

MHDSTPA Internal GRM Flow chart

 

Social Work Intervention for BCCAT beneficiaries

  1. ProceduresforGender-BasedViolence
  2. Process for Partnering agencies: NBB, BSIF, DIGI

All issues of Gender Based Violence shall be reported forthwith to the Police department within the respective district for action.

The Intake Officer/Agent will record the individual’s MIS# given during Assessment calls, if the individual is unaware of their MIS#, the Intake Officer/Agent will record a unique number that will be used to document in the monthly report sent to BSIF. Thisistoensureanonymity of the victimsidentify.

 

  1. Processfor MHDSTPA

Referralfrom Police department

The Police department will make contact with Women’s and Family Support service department (WFSD) within MHDSTPA to provide the necessary social work intervention.

A Supervisor from WFSD will assign a case worker, the case worker will visit the Police Station or HH to make contact with the victim. Assigned case worker will complete intake form on FAMCare and the standard response will follow.

In-Bound Call

All issues of Gender Based Violence shall be reported forthwith to the Police department within the respective district.

  1. Proceduresfor Child Protectionissues
  2. Process for Partnering agencies: NBB, BSIF, DIGI

All issues of child abuse and neglect shall be reported forthwith to the Department of Human Services (DHS) or the Police department within the respective district for action. The Intake Officer/Agent should capture the follow relevant information required during referral:

  • Name of victim
  • Name of allegedperpetrator
  • Relationshipbetweenvictim&allegedperpetrator
  • Home address
  • Currentlocation of the child
  • Type of abuse

If the Intake Officer/Agent is unable to capture the relevant information, the name of the child and location of the children shall be recorded and reported.

Intake Officer/Agent to report case to the BCCAT representative within the agency. BCCAT representative will record the information in the monthly report to BSIF. Name of victimwillnot be used in report.

  1. Processfor MHDSTPA

Referralfrom Police department

The Police department will make contact with DHS to provide the necessary social work intervention.

A Supervisor from DHS will assign a case worker. The case worker will visit the Police Station or HH to make contact with the victim. Assigned case worker will complete intake form on FAMCare and the standard response will follow.

 

  1. ProceduresforElderly abuse

Same process flow for DV cases will apply   for Elderly abuse.

 

Reporting procedures for fraudulent activities

All issues of suspected or confirmed fraudulent activities shall be reported forthwith to the Police department within the respective district for action.

  1. Process for Partnering agencies: NBB, BSIF, DIGI

Intake Officer/Agent will record the grievance using the agency’s internal system. The BCCAT representative for the partnering agency will process the information and submit referral to the MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point for action, whether it is to remove Payee or update the new Payee information.

  1. Processfor MHDSTPA

Intake Officer will record the grievance using FAMCare. The MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point will run a daily queries report for follow-up and action. Any complaints regarding fraudulent activities will be escalated to the MHDSTPA Management team for discussion. Base on outcome, the police department will be notified, the HH will be contacted in an effort to update the Payee information. MHDSTPA CERC Focal Point or a designated person will provide a formal response to the HH.

Bibliography

Environment and Social Management Framework. Climate Resilient Sustainable Agriculture project (CRESAP)-p172592 (draft, May 18th, 2020). Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and Immigration

 

Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (P127338). Component 4: Contingent Emergency Response Component.  Operations Manual. June 17, 2020. Prepared by: CRIP Project Management Unit. Revised July 28, 2020

 

Belize Climate Resilient Infrastructure Project (BCRIP) (P127338). Environment and Social Management Framework (ESMF) for the Contingent Emergency Response Component (CERC). June 3, 2020. CRIP Project Management Unit. Social Investment Fund (SIF)

 

Evaluation of Impacts and Needs & Emergency Action Plan (EAP) For the Activation of The Contingency Emergency Response Component (CERC) For the Agriculture Sector in Belize (July 28th, 2020).   Ministry of Food and Agriculture, and Immigration

 

Concept Environmental and Social Review Summary, at Concept Stage (ESRS Concept Stage). Date Prepared/Updated: 07/22/2020 | Report No: ESRSC01139.  Climate Resilient and Sustainable Agriculture Project (P172592).  The World Bank

 

Environment and Social Management Framework for COVID-19 Response. March, 2020. The World Bank

[1]As described in Project Appraisal Document (Report PAD712). July 9, 2014

[2]MoFAI Drought Report 2019

[3]Information from EMF BCRIP, 3/20/2014

[4]Bank Safeguard apply to the implementation of all activities under the CER Component. In the event of financing works under any given Emergency Action Plan, additional Bank policies and procedures may result applicable, and additional Bank authorizations may be required.

[5] International waterways include any river, canal, lake or similar body of water that forms a boundary between, or any river or surface water that flows through two or more states.

 

[6] Labor Management Procedures

[7] Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) risk

[8] Available at:  https://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/putontakeoffPPE/en/

 

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